How much of a factor was Communism in the mass emigration of Bulgaria's and Romania's Jewish populations after WWII?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
15,537
SoCal
#1
One thing that struck me as interesting is that the overwhelming majority of Bulgarian and Romanian Jews emigrated after the end of World War II in spite of the fact that the Bulgarian Jewish community was completely spared from the Holocaust and the Romanian Jewish community within Romania's 1914 borders was likewise largely spared from the Holocaust (with the 1941 Iasi pogrom being an exception to this rule). My point here is that, theoretically speaking, these two Jewish communities could have tried to continue existing in the countries where they and their ancestors have lived for centuries. However, they nevertheless decided to emigrate en masse--probably largely to Israel, but with a few moving to other places (such as the US).

What I am curious about is how much of a factor the Communist occupation and takeover of Bulgaria and Romania was in the decision of their Jewish populations' decision to emigrate en masse. In other words, had Bulgaria and Romania somehow been spared Communist occupation (not 100% implausible if the July 20th Plot would have succeeded), would anywhere near as much of their Jewish population have still emigrated after the end of World War II?
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
15,537
SoCal
#2
Also, I suppose that here's another related question about this: Had France never fallen in 1940 and both Bulgaria and Romania would have never actually entered WWII, and had Hitler still proceeded to kill a lot of Polish, Czech, and Slovak Jews--thus still resulting in Israel's creation after the end of WWII--would most of Bulgaria's and Romania's Jewish populations have still moved to Israel after the end of WWII? Or would most of them have been content to remain in Bulgaria and Romania in this scenario?