How much would Lot's wife been worth (as salt)?

Aug 2018
600
Southern Indiana
Salt was a precious commodity in ancient times, so I wonder, How much would Lot's wife have been worth as a pillar of salt?
Let's say she weighed 120 lbs. That's a Lot of salt to just leave laying around..

* Mods please feel free to move this if you think appropriate.
 

Kirialax

Ad Honorem
Dec 2009
4,904
Blachernai
The price of salt in the pre-modern Mediterranean seems to have been exaggerated: it does not seem to have been especially expensive. See Koder, Johannes. “Salt for Constantinople.” In Trade in Byzantium: papers from the Third International Sevgi Gönül Byzantine Studies Symposium, edited by Paul Magdalino and Nevra Necipoğlu, 91–103. Istanbul: Koç Üniversitesi, Anadolu Medeniyetleri Araṣtirma Merkezi, 2016, at 99-100.

The Romans imposed price caps. Diocletian's edict capped salt at 100 denarii for 1 modius castrensis (13.13 litres), but the fact that this needed to be regulated in a period of coin debasement opens all sorts of questions. @DiocletianIsBetterThanYou could tell us more.
 
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Dec 2013
338
Arkansas
I remember a short story from the Reader's Digest where a man discovers a statue of a beautiful woman. All white looking over her shoulder. He decides to smuggle her in the back of a truck back to Israel with the help of two other men. He kills a border guard at one point in order to continue his trip. But massive rain starts falling and when he reaches his destination he finds that the "woman" has dissolved and disappeared.
 
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sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
5,397
Sydney
Saffron is expensive because it cost a lot of man/hour to collect in quantity

as for the price of salt , depend where and when but it had been a valuable commodity since prehistoric times
it's better than smoking and curing for preserving food ,
very often , it was a source of income for the state through taxes
 

Angelica

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
2,773
Angel City
Salt is no longer a rare commodity great Inaqua produces tons of salt yearly.
 
Oct 2018
1,873
Sydney
The price of salt in the pre-modern Mediterranean seems to have been exaggerated: it does not seem to have been especially expensive. See Koder, Johannes. “Salt for Constantinople.” In Trade in Byzantium: papers from the Third International Sevgi Gönül Byzantine Studies Symposium, edited by Paul Magdalino and Nevra Necipoğlu, 91–103. Istanbul: Koç Üniversitesi, Anadolu Medeniyetleri Araṣtirma Merkezi, 2016, at 99-100.

The Romans imposed price caps. Diocletian's edict capped salt at 100 denarii for 1 modius castrensis (13.13 litres), but the fact that this needed to be regulated in a period of coin debasement opens all sorts of questions. @DiocletianIsBetterThanYou could tell us more.
So, I suppose this therefore means that in AD 301 one couldn't sell Lot's salt-pillar wife for more than 400 denarii.