How rich Ancient cities were?

Sep 2013
649
Ontario, Canada
What you have written here is utter fiction for the most part. I want a source to prove the following claim (a primary source); "That Pompey left the treasure behind hoping Caesar would get blamed".
Plutarch. If you have a copy of the Penguin Classics, it's on page 223. It describes Caesar entering Rome and taking the treasury, causing outrage amongst the tribunes, especially Metellus whom he almost put to death. It also describes on page 42 how the news of the events caused a panic at Rome, enough of it that when the consul Lentulus came to open the treasury, he did so and immediately fled Rome. He ran away. Why did he do that? Do you understand why Pompey couldn't move it? It wasn't that he forgot. It was that it was politically dangerous for him to do so. It wasn't said in so many words but clearly he left the majority of the money behind so that any outrage would land on Caesar.

And yes, Caesar did pay for his men out of his own pocket! He is famous for striking the first coins with his own portrait. From at least 49 BCE these were used to cover the army's and other expenses as he wanted everyone to know who was footing the bill. International banking system? He wouldn't need to do all this if money was so freely available.

We're way off the subject of the thread now. I've said enough about this. Computer game stuff? C'mon.
 

Caesarmagnus

Ad Honorem
Jan 2015
3,680
Australia
Plutarch. If you have a copy of the Penguin Classics, it's on page 223. It describes Caesar entering Rome and taking the treasury, causing outrage amongst the tribunes, especially Metellus whom he almost put to death. It also describes on page 42 how the news of the events caused a panic at Rome, enough of it that when the consul Lentulus came to open the treasury, he did so and immediately fled Rome. He ran away. Why did he do that? Do you understand why Pompey couldn't move it? It wasn't that he forgot. It was that it was politically dangerous for him to do so. It wasn't said in so many words but clearly he left the majority of the money behind so that any outrage would land on Caesar.

And yes, Caesar did pay for his men out of his own pocket! He is famous for striking the first coins with his own portrait. From at least 49 BCE these were used to cover the army's and other expenses as he wanted everyone to know who was footing the bill. International banking system? He wouldn't need to do all this if money was so freely available.

We're way off the subject of the thread now. I've said enough about this. Computer game stuff? C'mon.
I assume you mean Plutarch's Life of Caesar? It's irrelevant at any rate, because none of what you just claimed Plutarch says has any bearing on the question I asked. I asked whether there was any primary source evidence for Pompey intentionally leaving the Treasury, because he either "wanted Caesar to look bad" or "didn't dare think he'd take it". What you've written above is some other facts, then your personal interpretation that Pompey must have wanted that. The problem is the actual sources explicitly contradict your interpretation. You seem to get this, because you admit Pompey sent the consuls to collect the treasury... in which case, if he did that, then he wasn't leaving it by design; it was a screw up. The rest of what you said is the same risible logic:
- You claim it was "dangerous for Pompey to take the Treasury"; like, why? He claimed to represent Rome's legitimate government, and he had just looted various temples, so why would be balk at taking the treasury? He was ostensibly entitled to it. It's not going to look nearly as bad as the other stuff he'd just been doing; eg, taking a sword and illegally recruiting for months and months, having armies on standby in Italy, making illegal demands of Caesar, beating up the Tribunes, threatening to have Senators killed for defying him, ordering Rome to be abandoned, etc... but yeh he's worried about how taking the Treasury will look. Obviously nonsense anyway though, given you admit he ordered the consuls to take it.
- Rome might have been in a panic, but Pompey was meant to be the calm leader, not a hapless pleb with no idea what was going on. He had over a month to empty the treasury after Caesar crossed the Rubicon. It is laughable he didn't get around to it.
- Caesar paid for his men when he needed to, mainly to give bonuses that weren't authorized explicitly by the Senate, but he rightly expected Rome to foot the bill for his legions day to day wages. I don't even understand your point about how a banking system supposedly didn't exist because of some tenuous fact about a depiction on a coin that you're interpreting to support another tenuous personal interpretation. You're just wrong on this. Period.