How risky was it to openly advocate in favor of desegregation in the Jim Crow South?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,013
SoCal
#1
How risky was it to openly advocate in favor of desegregation in the Jim Crow South? I would think that a Black person who openly did this would have quickly gotten lynched for being "uppity" and for "not knowing his proper place," but what would have happened to a White person who openly did this?
 

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,283
#4
'Nigger lovers' shared the same fate as 'Niggers'. Simple.

.Many whites were lynched for fighting racism

(Clarification - the N word has been used here in historical context, I'll readily edit it out at the slightest hint of objection)
There were KKK lynchings of white Republicans in 1866-1880. Most whites were lynched in the west, where there often wasn't much formal law enforcement, or in the south for crimes.

I would be interested in any specific cases of white southerners lynched in the 20th century for opposing segregation.
 
Likes: Futurist
Apr 2018
697
India
#5
There were KKK lynchings of white Republicans in 1866-1880. Most whites were lynched in the west, where there often wasn't much formal law enforcement, or in the south for crimes.

I would be interested in any specific cases of white southerners lynched in the 20th century for opposing segregation.
James Reeb - Wikipedia
He was actually a northerner (Kansas) in south for the Civil Rights Movement.
 
Likes: Futurist
Jan 2010
4,439
Atlanta, Georgia USA
#6
There were KKK lynchings of white Republicans in 1866-1880. Most whites were lynched in the west, where there often wasn't much formal law enforcement, or in the south for crimes.

I would be interested in any specific cases of white southerners lynched in the 20th century for opposing segregation.
As ‘lynching’ means a violent and unlawful murder, the murders in Philadelphia MS in 1964 of Michael Schwerner and Andrew Goodman qualify. James Chaney was African-American. They weren’t from the south, however,
 
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betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,283
#7
The people mentioned were northern civil rights agitators in the early 1960s. Nothing would happen to you for being a Republican in the early to mid 20th century south. You wouldn't get elected to anything being against segregation, but you wouldn't be killed. Similarly, before the Civil War, it was acceptable to be against secession, but not to be an abolitionist.

No one has yet come up with a single white southerner who was killed for anti-segregationist views in the 20th century. There clearly weren't large numbers of lynchings of whites for their political views.
 
Likes: Futurist
Apr 2018
697
India
#8
The people mentioned were northern civil rights agitators in the early 1960s. Nothing would happen to you for being a Republican in the early to mid 20th century south. You wouldn't get elected to anything being against segregation, but you wouldn't be killed. Similarly, before the Civil War, it was acceptable to be against secession, but not to be an abolitionist.

No one has yet come up with a single white southerner who was killed for anti-segregationist views in the 20th century. There clearly weren't large numbers of lynchings of whites for their political views.
What I understand is that lynchings in literal sense became quite rare post 1930s. Civil Rights murders were therefore more 'murders' than 'lynchings'. Emmett Till murder was a pure abduction and deliberate murder. Medgar Evers was shot. Now if this were 1880s Emmett would have been barbecued alive and Evers would have been hung upside down with his university enrollment form stuffed in his mouth and riddled with bullets, all in a carnival (in Evers' someone would have put a sign - "Niggers who read; will like that bleed!").

In other words, probably more than half of the Civil Rights murders were not lynchings but simple race murders. Another thing, FBI back in those days was more concerned about communist in civil rights groups than the KKK. J Edgar Hoover deliberately tried to sabotage those investigations and this near permanently destroyed the agency's reputation when it came to civil rights. What I guess is, many such murders weren't probably even given proper attention as hate/race crimes.

My knowledge of the subject comes mostly from fiction, Wikipedia and links given below Wiki. Perhaps someone more knowlegable about civil rights cold cases will give you a better insight.
 
Likes: Futurist
Jun 2017
397
maine
#9
The people mentioned were northern civil rights agitators in the early 1960s. Nothing would happen to you for being a Republican in the early to mid 20th century south. You wouldn't get elected to anything being against segregation, but you wouldn't be killed. Similarly, before the Civil War, it was acceptable to be against secession, but not to be an abolitionist.
Sorry, I disagree. Dr. Richard Emmanuel in the Montgomery Advertiser (25 Sep 2017): "So there it is, the inconvenient truth. The truth that more than 1,000 whites were lynched and many of them were lynched because they were Republican, because they supported their fellow black citizens and because they opposed the lawless act of lynching."
 
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betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,283
#10
Sorry, I disagree. Dr. Richard Emmanuel in the Montgomery Advertiser (25 Sep 2017): "So there it is, the inconvenient truth. The truth that more than 1,000 whites were lynched and many of them were lynched because they were Republican, because they supported their fellow black citizens and because they opposed the lawless act of lynching."
There were white Republicans lynched during Reconstruction. Most whites who were lynched were lynched for crimes.

I see some references here to blacks and northerners killed for their roles in the civil rights movement, but not a single white southerner killed for racial views in the 20th century.
 
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