How risky was it to openly advocate in favor of desegregation in the Jim Crow South?

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,283
#42
Segregation ended due to federal legislation and US Supreme Court decisions. The southern states with their almost all white electorate never wanted to change the system. George Wallace carried the deep south in 1968.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,013
SoCal
#43
Segregation ended due to federal legislation and US Supreme Court decisions. The southern states with their almost all white electorate never wanted to change the system. George Wallace carried the deep south in 1968.
Makes one wonder what Wallace would have done had he miraculously won the US Presidency in 1968 (with the help of Alien Space Bats, of course ;)).
 
Apr 2018
697
India
#44
Segregation ended due to federal legislation and US Supreme Court decisions. The southern states with their almost all white electorate never wanted to change the system. George Wallace carried the deep south in 1968.
It was actually because of Wallace's actions I was asking the question. Generally incumbent politicians don't go that teeth and nail unless they themselves are mad about whatever is happening or they have serious ambitions. I guess race was his Ace in the hole for everything (presidency, governorship).
 
Likes: Futurist
Apr 2018
697
India
#49
He was doing what he thought was enforcing the law and obeying orders from the President as a National Guard general, not actually taking a political position supporting civil rights.
Yes. Military officers generally do not speak out about their views but their actions tell a lot. And the White House wouldn't have counted on him if they didn't trust him. It's what I get from this obituary in NYT -
H. V. Graham, 82, Dies; Led Guard in Crises
.
 
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betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,283
#50
The state constitutions adopted 1888-1904 prevented most to almost all blacks and some to most poor whites from voting. After that the Republican Party had no chance in statewide elections. The Republicans were still somewhat of a force in the upper south, mostly strong in what had been Unionist areas.
Everyone assumed that the Republicans took a less segregationist approach, but they generally didn't emphasize it, so as not to lose even worse.

There were also Democrats who took less segregationist approaches. For example, some candidates opposed the KKK, but did not call for an end of segregation.