How risky was it to openly advocate in favor of desegregation in the Jim Crow South?

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,051
#62
Yes, of course it is/was more dangerous to walk around a bad black neighborhood as a white person than to be black. It wasn't that dangerous to be black. There was a Jim Crow system, with bad education, most blacks prevented from voting, etc. There were lynchings and a severe legal system, particularly directed against black on white crime. As I indicated, the system became more racist as you went from the north to the border states, to the upper south, and the deep south.
 
Likes: Futurist
Nov 2013
692
Texas
#63
I am not sure that anyone argued against segregation as an expensive nuisance.

Passengers in long distance trains and buses did have to rearrange themselves when crossing into states that practiced segregation. I am not sure about planes. There were not a large number of black plane passengers and most of those were middle class.
I'd argue that they did; one reason for the end of segregation is that was becoming inconsistent with the great American economy.

It wasn't good for the southern economy either (but racism in the south was a bit like Heorine; it wasn't very good but they couldn't casually kick the habit either; so they kept on to the Jim Crow laws despite it's gross innefficiency.) Sooner or later though they had to go; and did in the 1960s
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,039
SoCal
#64
I'd argue that they did; one reason for the end of segregation is that was becoming inconsistent with the great American economy.

It wasn't good for the southern economy either (but racism in the south was a bit like Heorine; it wasn't very good but they couldn't casually kick the habit either; so they kept on to the Jim Crow laws despite it's gross innefficiency.) Sooner or later though they had to go; and did in the 1960s
If it wasn't for federal intervention, Jim Crow could have lasted a lot longer. For instance, only one Southern US state actually replaced its anti-miscegenation law during the 20th century before the Loving v. Virginia decision-0-it was Maryland, and it was done shortly before the Loving case was decided.
 

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,051
#65
If it wasn't for federal intervention, Jim Crow could have lasted a lot longer. For instance, only one Southern US state actually replaced its anti-miscegenation law during the 20th century before the Loving v. Virginia decision-0-it was Maryland, and it was done shortly before the Loving case was decided.
The southern states absolutely did not end segregation voluntarily. In general, they did not implement the Supreme Court school desegregation decision for many years. It was only dismantled in response to federal legislation and court decisions. Goldwater carried the deep south and his home state in 1964. Wallace carried the deep south in 1968.
 
Likes: Futurist

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,051
#66
There was particularly resistance to the school desegregation decision, which was seen as illegitimate, particularly as it apparently overruled precedent of Plessy vs. Ferguson, 1896. There was not outright rebellion or a new civil war though. Resistance was strongest in the deep south and Virginia.

Ole Miss riot of 1962 - Wikipedia
Southern Manifesto - Wikipedia
Massive resistance - Wikipedia
1957 Georgia Memorial to Congress - Wikipedia
History - Joint Resolution of the Georgia General Assembly regarding the 14th and 15th Amendments - GeorgiaInfo
Resistance to Civil Rights
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,039
SoCal
#67
There was particularly resistance to the school desegregation decision, which was seen as illegitimate, particularly as it apparently overruled precedent of Plessy vs. Ferguson, 1896. There was not outright rebellion or a new civil war though. Resistance was strongest in the deep south and Virginia.

Ole Miss riot of 1962 - Wikipedia
Southern Manifesto - Wikipedia
Massive resistance - Wikipedia
1957 Georgia Memorial to Congress - Wikipedia
History - Joint Resolution of the Georgia General Assembly regarding the 14th and 15th Amendments - GeorgiaInfo
Resistance to Civil Rights
Unfortunately, that's what happens when the US Supreme Court makes a ruling without finding the basis for this ruling in the 14th Amendment's legislative history. It was the same with Roe v. Wade almost twenty years later.
 
Mar 2015
843
Europe
#68
About objections to segregation as expensive nuisance:
Were long distance trains that connected southern and northern destinations required to observe segregation?
Were domestic interstate airlines that served southern airports required to observe segregation?
In case of Plessy v. Ferguson, the railway objected to expenses of segregation - needing more cars to segregate the passengers - and supported Plessy in trying to get a Supreme Court judgment against segregation.
The first attempt was actually Daniel Desdunes travelling Louisiana to Alabama - to test the authority to regulate interstate transportation under Commerce Clause. And already Louisiana Supreme Court declared that only Federal laws could regulate interstate transport, even between southern states that both practiced segregation intrastate.
 
May 2019
134
Salt Lake City, Utah
#69
How risky was it to openly advocate in favor of desegregation in the Jim Crow South? I would think that a Black person who openly did this would have quickly gotten lynched for being "uppity" and for "not knowing his proper place," but what would have happened to a White person who openly did this?
Depends on the individual, his family, the community, and location.
 

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