How the pyramids were built

cladking

Ad Honorem
Nov 2011
2,772
exile
I believe this was invented as a last ditch effort to save ramps.

The workers village is too small to house stone draggers so they were moved to living on ramps. Since there are no ramps between the workers village and the pyramid they claim stones could be dragged on wet sand.

In the real world I seriously doubt any of the sleds could be loaded with even the smallest stones and have the skis stay on the top. In the real world hauling this amount of uphill from the Nile might not save much work anyway.

Clay is slippery and is evidence. Even wet sand is not slippery and would grind the wooden sleds to a nub in very short order. There are no overseers of sled builders or bucket brigades either. And there's still no evidence pyramids employed ramps.
 
Sep 2013
624
Ontario, Canada
The most compelling piece of evidence I've seen which hints at how the construction might've happened, someone took density readings of the entire pyramid in 1980. Basically they found that the points of the pyramid were much less dense than the rest. It was thought the blocks were originally stacked in a certain pattern suggesting a ramp may have wound around the pyramid as it rose from the bedrock during construction. Once the pyramid was topped, the removal of the ramp while finishing the limestone surfaces uncovered the final structure. How they managed to move so many blocks (something like 2.3 million) in a supposed 20 year period is a mystery, but they would've needed something to act as rollers to easily pull and move those huge blocks quickly and efficiently. Sand and water is a good possibility, both were definitely in abundance.
 

cladking

Ad Honorem
Nov 2011
2,772
exile
The most compelling piece of evidence I've seen which hints at how the construction might've happened, someone took density readings of the entire pyramid in 1980. Basically they found that the points of the pyramid were much less dense than the rest. It was thought the blocks were originally stacked in a certain pattern suggesting a ramp may have wound around the pyramid as it rose from the bedrock during construction. Once the pyramid was topped, the removal of the ramp while finishing the limestone surfaces uncovered the final structure. How they managed to move so many blocks (something like 2.3 million) in a supposed 20 year period is a mystery, but they would've needed something to act as rollers to easily pull and move those huge blocks quickly and efficiently. Sand and water is a good possibility, both were definitely in abundance.
Bui did the scan in 1986/7.

H. D. Bui

It's probably the last nail in the coffin for ramps since mosat of the lines are parallel to the base. The scan appears to depict a five step pyramid with each step exactly 81' 3".
 

davu

Ad Honorem
Jun 2010
4,078
Retired - This Mountain isn't on a Map
Originally Posted by cladking
...believe this was invented as a last ditch effort to save ramps....
I think, on the face for just "one" stone sounds good, but they have -- what --- 2.5 million of them and what is "just right" --- these are humans -- so one guy out of 5000 (stones) gets the mix wrong -- then what --- wait for the sand to dry -- remember we have a schedule here --- no screw ups.

the picture shows him "pouring" the water --- I just ran outside to check this and pouring the water from 4 feet in the air created a "ditch" in the sand/dirt...... hummmmmmmmm
 
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