How to teach kids what Islam is?

Sep 2012
8,757
India
#31
I have recently purchased a book by M.J.Akbar, India's noted journalist and author of a number of books. The book is titled ' Tinderbox The Past and the Future of Pakistan ' . Published by Harper Collins India, the ISBN is 978-93-5029-194-8.
On pages 268,269 and 270, the author describes the contents of the textbooks prescribed for Pakistani kids in the 4th or 5th standard.
" M. Ayaz Naseem writes in his essay ' Textbooks and the construction of Militarism in Pakistan ', that ' no scientists, artists, social workers, journalist or statesmen are deemed worth (sic ) of inclusion ' among the heroes in textbooks; ' military heroes are the only heroes. Civilians, minorities and women are simply absent' . He adds, ' A class 5 textbook ( 2002 ),for example ,states that, "Hindu has always been the enemy" .----
---Urdu textbook for class 4 ( 2002 ) which wants the students to understand that the Indians/Hindus are scheming and conniving people. A class 4 social Studies textbook ( 2002) tells the student that it is the Hindu religion that makes them so as it does not teach them " good things ".
More examples can be given.
So the O.P. should realise that the kids in Pakistan are being taught pure hatred.
 

antocya

Ad Honorem
May 2012
5,688
Iraq
#32
I have met Christians that would dispute that. There are some Christian groups that believe firmly in a literal reading of the bible, very much including the old testament. They may not have the ancient Jewish law but they are adamant on "returning to the bible" as they see it. They believe in Judgement day and a fiery destruction for everyone who isn't one of them.

Of course I've met other more peaceful Christians who aren't like that at all. But it does exist.
Many Christians believe everything in the Bible literally happened. Maybe some believe it’s the literal spoken word of God. There isn’t anywhere near the emphasis in Christianity on memorization of the Bible like there is for the Quran and definitely not on memorizing it in the original languages.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
4,617
Portugal
#33
Many Christians believe everything in the Bible literally happened.
Don’t know how you quantify many. But in “many” countries of Europe “many” Christians can’t quote a sentence from the bible, think that there are some interesting stories for children there, go one or two times a year to a church and at the end don’t have a clue about the words spoken in the sermon.
 
Oct 2016
692
On a magic carpet
#34
Don’t know how you quantify many. But in “many” countries of Europe “many” Christians can’t quote a sentence from the bible, think that there are some interesting stories for children there, go one or two times a year to a church and at the end don’t have a clue about the words spoken in the sermon.
Religion as a tourist attraction, rather than a way of life.
 
Jan 2018
283
Netherlands
#38
And then, to ensure balance, read the Old Testament and especially the Book of Leviticus. And then ask yourself why the vast majority of modern Christians do not espouse the misogyny, homopohobia, pederasty, sexual violence and insane brutality clearly prescribed in their holy book.
Probably in part because there is an in-built tension between the precepts of the Old Law given to Moses and the New Law revealed by Christ several centuries later.
 
Oct 2016
692
On a magic carpet
#39
Probably in part because there is an in-built tension between the precepts of the Old Law given to Moses and the New Law revealed by Christ several centuries later.
Or if you believe the Reza Aslan revisionist view of Jesus, the contradiction was not originally there but later writers creating the later books of the new testament gradually re-wrote Jesus as a kind of more distant, esoteric and abstract figure, following the Roman destruction of Jerusalem in around 70AD.

They did this because the concept of actual armed revolution against Rome had become thoroughly discredited by the mass slaughter and total destruction of Jerusalem that resulted from the failed Jewish rebellion, which was crushed with extreme brutality by the Roman legions.

In that context, Jesus words were interpreted as more referring to an abstract "spiritual kingdom", rather than a real independent state here on earth. That trend was also reinforced when Greek-speaking upper class Jews such as Paul of Tarsus incorporated much of Greek philosophy into Christianity, giving it a more abstract and universalist appeal.
 
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Jan 2018
283
Netherlands
#40
Or if you believe the Reza Aslan revisionist view of Jesus, the contradiction was not originally there but later writers creating the later books of the new testament gradually re-wrote Jesus as a kind of more distant, esoteric and abstract figure, following the Roman destruction of Jerusalem in around 70AD.

They did this because the concept of actual armed revolution against Rome had become thoroughly discredited by the mass slaughter and total destruction of Jerusalem that resulted from the failed Jewish rebellion, which was crushed with extreme brutality by the Roman legions.

In that context, Jesus words were interpreted as more referring to an abstract "spiritual kingdom", rather than a real independent state here on earth. That trend was also reinforced when Greek-speaking upper class Jews such as Paul of Tarsus incorporated much of Greek philosophy into Christianity, giving it a more abstract and universalist appeal.
Possibly. When I said "Christ" I actually meant the scriptural Jesus, not the historical person. What he really said or did is less relevant for the behavior of his followers than what they believe he said or did based on the scriptures.
 

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