How were ships & boats brought into & out of water throughout history?

Oct 2017
339
America ??
I’m not quite sure why I can’t seem to be able to find much information about this online. Is it one of them things we just have to assume was successfully done somehow?

I’m sure ships & boats had to be brought out of water periodically for maintainable & repair throughout history.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,972
Portugal
I’m not quite sure why I can’t seem to be able to find much information about this online. Is it one of them things we just have to assume was successfully done somehow?

I’m sure ships & boats had to be brought out of water periodically for maintainable & repair throughout history.
It would depend of the timeline you are thinking and naturally the size of the boat/ship. I still recall the way the fishermen did some decades ago with their boats on a fishing village, pushing them to the beach at the afternoon and that back to the sea in the next day. They pushed with the strength of their arms and pulled with ropes, sometimes with an ox, more recently with a tractor. The boat slid in the sand above tree trunks.
 

Chlodio

Forum Staff
Aug 2016
4,580
Dispargum
One possibility was to beach the boat at high tide. Then you have a few hours of dry boat until the next high tide. Or you could use the high tide to raise the boat part of the way and reduce the muscle work. Human or animal muscle would then only have to move the boat a few more feet to keep it out of the next high tide. You could do the same thing in Egypt where the Nile floods and recedes at predictable times. Then you would have several months before the next flood to work on your boat.
 
Aug 2019
16
SPAIN
One possibility was to beach the boat at high tide. Then you have a few hours of dry boat until the next high tide. Or you could use the high tide to raise the boat part of the way and reduce the muscle work. Human or animal muscle would then only have to move the boat a few more feet to keep it out of the next high tide. You could do the same thing in Egypt where the Nile floods and recedes at predictable times. Then you would have several months before the next flood to work on your boat.
Yes, that was the common practice in an age when drydocks where few and reserved to great ships:
Careening
 

Attachments

Mar 2019
1,954
Kansas
Yes, that was the common practice in an age when drydocks where few and reserved to great ships:
Careening
It also had the advantage that it needed little specialist equipment. Many of the great nautical explorers had to do this far from any assistance, other than what they carried on board.
 
Apr 2014
243
Liverpool, England
I've studied constitutional right and I'd say that Article I, Section 10 of US Constitution is really clear about what states cannot do in absolute [before of stating what is impossible without the approval of the Congress].

To make a present comparison, UK is leaving EU following the procedure written in EU "Constitution" [it's not exactly a constitution, but the substance is the same].
The relevance of this escapes me.