How would you rate Zhukov?

Lee-Sensei

Ad Honorem
Aug 2012
2,122
I've heard of that before. It was some payback for losing to the Japanese in 1905. How did it change the course of the war though?
From what I’ve read, the defeat of Japan by Zhukov played a role in Japans decision not to attack the Soviet Union during the war. Not that it would matter. Eastern Russia was huge, sparsely populated, had poor infrastructure and Japan would be at a steep technological disadvantage. They’d probably have far more logistical problems than their German allies.
 
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Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
6,140
Portugal
@ Tulius , .........trolling or do you have some insight to share ?

if the later I would certainly be keen for you to share it
Hi Sparky,

Sorry, I just saw this post addressed to me now. If you used the quote system or there isn’t a space between the nick and the “@” I would receive a message.

About the question, I have a position that I can share, if it is an insight or not I will leave it to your consideration. I really don’t consider myself a “troll” even if the comment may be seen as provocative due to the low rate. Anyway the first poster didn’t indicate any methodology of evaluation of the person, just mentioned feelings, so I assume that there wasn’t a methodology or that any poster could have its own methodology or his own feelings. This path allows any kind of rate.

About rating historical figures I recall that I opened a thread some time ago that was basically an enquire to other fellow members (How do we rate historical figures?). In that thread I had already confessed that I had difficulty to evaluate objectively with a rate a historical figure when I had not objective tools to analyse it or an objective methodology.

So in this case, for this historical figure, I used a simple strategy, I just evaluated my knowledge about the figure, on a 0 to 10 scale. And found it pretty basic. And the rating about the figure would be my feeling towards him the rate would be 0, since I don’t have feelings, either positive or negative about the figure. Naturally if other methodology is used, other rating would be achieved. Maybe this is the beginning of my objective “grid”, that I mentioned in the first post of the other thread.

Sorry if my answer lead to an out of topic theme. After all it is just a game.

But the point as that in this game, any rate is valid since any user uses its own method.
 

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
5,357
Sydney
Hi Sparky
Sorry if my answer lead to an out of topic theme. After all it is just a game.

But the point as that in this game, any rate is valid since any user uses its own method.
Fair enough , Zhukov is quite a discussed figure , he had very contrasted results
his best was the planing of the 6th Army encirclement at Stalingrad , his worst was the crossing of the Oder during the final Berlin offensive
he certainly had a lot of respect from the army and inspired confidence from the soldiers to the officers
in particular he had to interface with Stalin on military matters , this required a mixture of professionalism , subservience and authority
not too easy to juggle but Stalin , always the ultimate realist , recognized his abilities and kept him until the end of the war

Stalin was very careful to keep him on his toes , favoring other generals with his good will and making sure he had subordinates who were not devoted to him
he then pushed him aside , getting him a front command toward the end and tasked him with taking Berlin , the ultimate prize
after the war he was kept away from the central command of the Army

Khrushchev called on him and his prestige with the army to get rid of Beria and seize power
the present Russian government rose his personage to hero status , not totally undeserved
 

martin76

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
6,812
Spain
one of the best commanders in WW2 and likely, together Brussilov, the best Russian General in 20th Century.
 

Maki

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
3,767
Republika Srpska
A fact the Japanese failed to ever mention to the Germans lol
I guess the Japanese believed Barbarossa to be a fortunate development for them since the USSR had to divert all of its attention to the German invasion.
 

MG1962a

Ad Honorem
Mar 2019
2,193
Kansas
I guess the Japanese believed Barbarossa to be a fortunate development for them since the USSR had to divert all of its attention to the German invasion.
I was reading a book about the Tripartite Pact, and how the Japanese intentionally kept the information from the Germans during negotiations. The author then went on to ponder if the Germans would have still been all in, knowing the Japanese were not capable of back dooring the Soviets
 

Maki

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
3,767
Republika Srpska
I was reading a book about the Tripartite Pact, and how the Japanese intentionally kept the information from the Germans during negotiations. The author then went on to ponder if the Germans would have still been all in, knowing the Japanese were not capable of back dooring the Soviets
I lean towards "yes". Hitler was underrating the Red Army.
 
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MG1962a

Ad Honorem
Mar 2019
2,193
Kansas
I lean towards "yes". Hitler was underrating the Red Army.
He definitely underrated their production capacity

But I think your 'yes' is correct. He says as much in this recording. Actually starts at about the 2 minute mark. Rest is waffle

 
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