Humans as one of the great apes, why is it controversial?

heylouis

Ad Honorem
Apr 2013
6,612
China
human is formed with continuous war.

other animals, at best, only do body fight.

that means, out of actual smart of out of just luck, ancestors of human exterminated other apes, so human expanded.

that also means, you should not expect a mutated-subspecies of human that is significantly different from human and significant in numbers
the individuals who gain such mutation, good or bad, either have to share the mutation among human with normal reproduces, or will be discriminated and exterminated.

honestly, i do not expect people actually would apply "democracy" to them. people are doing bad enough to people even now.

human can and will evolve, but will hardly be replaced, as it actually happens to other animals.


on this point, human is actually different from "other apes"

being in existence is something very important!

however, being in existence is the result, not the reason.

the controversy might form if someone thinks being in existence is a reason, not result.
 
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VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,733
Florania
As he states in the article, "ape" is not a taxonomic term. It's for classification. We have so many fundamental changes that we're as different from the living apes today as monkeys are, perhaps moreso, I think is his argument.

I don't think anyone is denying the taxonomic relations between us and the great apes (unless they're religious like some Christians and Muslims).

Not that I even care what term people use. I'm much more interested in the details of human evolution, not the semantics of common-use terms.
Should we care why our fellow Homo erectus, Homo neanderthals, and Denisovans went extinct? We have very few Denisovan fossils; then, we have the genome and we can
probably rebuild the phenotype.

It's not controversial in any meaningful way. It's kind of like the fake controversy with saying the world is a globe. But it's not contentious as a topic like climate change; despite the fact, 99.94% of peer-reviewed climate science studies support the view that human activity on earth is impacting the climate.
The unfortunate fact is that humans are not very good with reality; we have been constructing our shared imaginations and stories ever since the Cognitive Revolution.
 

Haakbus

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
3,803
United States
Should we care why our fellow Homo erectus, Homo neanderthals, and Denisovans went extinct? We have very few Denisovan fossils; then, we have the genome and we can
probably rebuild the phenotype.



The unfortunate fact is that humans are not very good with reality; we have been constructing our shared imaginations and stories ever since the Cognitive Revolution.
They didn't actually fully go extinct, Neanderthals and Denisovans at least. Some remnant of them was absorbed into the early Homo sapiens inherited by many of us today.
 

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
3,609
Las Vegas, NV USA
Human eyes have exception motion detection capacity. We also have the best stamina of any Hominidea
Yes. Just what they needed to detect and run away from superior beasts who could take over any territory humans might want to hold.
 
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MG1962a

Ad Honorem
Mar 2019
2,161
Kansas
Yes. Just what they needed detect and run away from superior beasts who could take over any territory humans might want to hold.
I didn't say Humans were fast. They have excellent stamina. Means you can get on the trail of something, and stay on it as long as needed.
 

AlpinLuke

Forum Staff
Oct 2011
27,360
Italy, Lago Maggiore
I don't think that contradicts my calling humans a degenerate form of the great apes.
I can concede that the human beings are not exactly typical great apes; may be Neanderthals were more "standard" as great apes, even if they preferred to stand and walk as well. In fact some characteristics of the majority of the great apes are to have short legs, to be fury, to have strong arms and the possibility to use also the feet to grasp. About these aspects Neanderthals and Humans have developed towards a less "agile" configuration [and less powerful if we think to gorillas and orangutans]. On the other hand, the capability to stand and walk in a constant way has set hands free from duties connected with locomotion ...
 

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
3,609
Las Vegas, NV USA
They didn't actually fully go extinct, Neanderthals and Denisovans at least. Some remnant of them was absorbed into the early Homo sapiens inherited by many of us today.
Note all Homo species are extinct accept us. Sapien means wise but are we? It's true after cowering in dark corners just trying to survive we finally figured out how organize for a successful hunt. We became serious meat eaters. Some say meat made us smarter. No. Learning to work together made us smarter. We had to invent language to do it well. From there we bootstrapped ourselves to the top of the food chain. So here we are with all our problems solved. Or are they? :think:
 
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