I am an Iranian Azeri trying to figure out who my people were

Jul 2018
63
North America
#51
If I was wealthy, I would chose LA.



I know that biologically, we are all humans and it is meaningless to try to label us as ethnic Azeri, Persian, Turk, British or whatever. It all comes down to culture.

But I am interested in History. Thats why Im curious. I want to know when this turkification started. And what culture there was before that time. If we look at northwestern Iran. That region is called Azerbaijan. Azeris used to have a very nomadic lifestyle. And I believe many of them still live a nomadic lifestyle.

Today we speak Azeri. But when and why did these people start to speak Azeri? Is it possible that it was an unpopulated area. And while some of these turkic nomads migrated to that part and continued to live as nomads. Some of them settled and founded towns and cities there? But again. If the place was unpopulated. Why do we not look like Turks from Central Asia? We must have mixed with he locals. Do you think Irans Azeri population is a part of the Turko-Mongol migration?

Its such a shame that not everyone has a family tree.

All you ****s calling me a troll. Saying I am someone from the forum with a fake account etc. Don't hijack this thread. **** off, take your conspiracy somewhere else.
1) either you are a turkified Iranian.

Or

2) a Turk (by lineage) that turkified majority of your countrymen.
 
Jun 2012
7,067
Malaysia
#52
i thought the geographic name Azerbaijan derives from a pesonal name, the name of the governor Atropates from the antiquity
What wud you get if you back-transliterate the Greek sounding Atropates into the Iranian or Persian form? Maybe Hatropata, or Hadropada, or something like that. Sorry, just guessing here now.
 
Jul 2012
736
Australia
#54
In 5 pages of comments no-one has mentioned the geography of the region. For my personal purposes I call the Caucasus area "Crossroads of Empires". The local people here (Azeris, Armenians, Kurds and others) have struggled to create and maintain independent political entities as it has been too easy for neighbours to project their power into the region, leading to the area being a kind of borderland, an area where permanency was not possible as control and influence shifted from one neighbour to another. From the south east it was Persia. From the west it was the Mesopotamians, Greeks, Arabs and later Ottomans. From the north it was the steppe nomads, turkic people (of which modern day Turkey is a sub-set) and the Russians. The identities of local people would over time be battered by varying influences, some resisted, many adopted. It is an area where a Fredrik Barth type of analysis - ethnic groups defined by the boundaries they setup and maintain, and not by biology, language, religion and general cultural traits - would be useful.
 
Jun 2012
7,067
Malaysia
#55
^
Well, I hv always been inclined to believe - with some room for some variation & modification in certain circumstances - that every nation to a quite substantial extent is the result of mixing between all the other nations that hv been living around it physically over the ages. Or, at the very least, impacted substantially in terms of lineage & ancestry by some physical interaction with them. No nation is ever really pure.
 

Afrasiyab

Ad Honorem
Sep 2007
6,378
#56
What wud you get if you back-transliterate the Greek sounding Atropates into the Iranian or Persian form? Maybe Hatropata, or Hadropada, or something like that. Sorry, just guessing here now.

Azerbaijan from Atropates is highly unlikely, almost bordering etymological banality. Azeri coming from the Khazar is more logical for obvious reasons. It's like how some scholars split hairs to derive the name of the Black Sea from an Avestan word that means "black, dark" which was never used for the Sea itself.