I have a question about old England armor.

Sep 2012
1,018
Tarkington, Texas
#11
Armor and weaponry depended on whether they were rich or poor. Wealthy people wore more armor and carried better weapons. The Poor might come with a sling or some javelins with their everyday clothes. Bodyguards of the wealthy wore less armor but could carry a sword or a good spear and a shield. The Fyrd would show up with whatever they had. They might have a Bow, an Assegai or a Tomahawk. Horses would be rode as transport and not Cavalry. An Assegai is a term not used often in European descriptions, but it is a more descriptive term than "Spear". My favorite description is a short spear that can be thrown or used in close. If the warrior saw it was going to go close combat, they would step on the spear and shorten the haft.

Nobles could wear mail or maybe some plate. The swords would not bend during combat.

Pruitt
 
Likes: macon
Aug 2014
4,466
Australia
#13
Anglo-Saxon 11th century huscarls wore triple mail hauberks, you can see them on the Bayeux Tapestry.
When an old text uses the phrase "thrice done", "thrice made", etc., it simply means that it was well done. It doesn't mean that the task was done three times. "Thrice-woven mail" simply means that it was well made.

Sometimes two layers of mail were worn and very rarely three layers were worn but it was hardly normal to do that. The Bayeux Tapestry doesn't show this kind of detail; it is so crude that it barely possible to tell that mail is being worn.
 
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Likes: macon

Haesten

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
2,905
#14
When an old text uses the phrase "thrice done", "thrice made", etc., it simply means that it was well done. It doesn't mean that the task was done three times. "Thrice-woven mail" simply means that it was well made.

Sometimes two layers of mail were worn and very rarely three layers were worn but it was hardly normal to do that. The Bayeux Tapestry doesn't show this kind of detail; it is so crude that it barely possible to tell that mail is being worn.
Triple mail comes from Florence - 1040 gift of 80 huscarls by Godwin to Harthacnut. Triple is the weave of the rings as far as I know, not three mail coats.
 

Dan Howard

Ad Honorem
Aug 2014
4,466
Australia
#16
Triple mail comes from Florence - 1040 gift of 80 huscarls by Godwin to Harthacnut. Triple is the weave of the rings as far as I know, not three mail coats.
There is no such thing as triple mail. The phrase "thrice-woven mail" simply means that the armour was well made. It was a common colloquialism at the time.
 
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authun

Ad Honorem
Aug 2011
5,173
#18
I still wonder what kind of armor Anglo Saxon they wear in 9-11th, before Norman period in England.
Mail shirts and full length byrnies would be used for protection only by the very wealthy, here the english huscarls are being attacked by the norman cavalry.





but the main protection for most, came from the shield, no armour, as here in the bayeux tapestry:

bayeux.png
 
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Feb 2017
196
Devon, UK
#19
Four helmets have been found which date to the anglo saxon period. The 7th century Benty Grange helmet is made of bone and has a christian cross and wild boar motifs, replica:





The best preserved is known as the Coppergate Helmet found at the Jorvik dig in the 1970s. It dates to the 8th century.




The most famous is the Sutton Hoo Helmet, replica:



The last is the badly coroded Shorewell helmet, replica:



There is also a cheek piece from a helmet which was found in Staffordshire:



I have never seen a viking period helmet that looked like those depicted in your photo.
The Staffordshire Hoard contained numerous pieces from a richly decorated, helmet, two reconstructions have recently been completed and displayed. The Staffordshire Hoard
 

authun

Ad Honorem
Aug 2011
5,173
#20
The Staffordshire Hoard contained numerous pieces from a richly decorated, helmet, two reconstructions have recently been completed and displayed. The Staffordshire Hoard
Those reconstructions are conjecture, that's why it states, "the project explored how the original may have been made and what it looked like". There was no frame which suggested the construction technique or shape. The only 'part' is the earpiece, similar to that on Sutton Hoo, and parts of the rim. The Pressblech elements, the figures, are panels which cover the surface are common. But, we don't know if it is a late roman ridge construction or of the spangenhelm type or indeed some other construction method. It looks as if they have used the typically vendel period helmets from Valsgarde as inspiration.

helm1.jpg


helm2.jpg
 
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