If the German invasion of France fails in 1940 and an anti-Nazi coup occurs in Germany afterwards, is a compromise peace likely to occur?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
19,606
SoCal
#1
If the German invasion of France fails in 1940 and an anti-Nazi coup occurs in Germany afterwards, is a compromise peace likely to occur? Or are the gaps between the two sides (the Anglo-French and the new, post-Nazi German government) simply going to be too large for the two sides to agree on a compromise peace?

Thoughts?
 
Mar 2019
1,431
Kansas
#2
If the German invasion of France fails in 1940 and an anti-Nazi coup occurs in Germany afterwards, is a compromise peace likely to occur? Or are the gaps between the two sides (the Anglo-French and the new, post-Nazi German government) simply going to be too large for the two sides to agree on a compromise peace?

Thoughts?
Going to depend on exactly what 'compromise' means. Is the Polish question answered?
 

Futurist

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May 2014
19,606
SoCal
#3
Going to depend on exactly what 'compromise' means. Is the Polish question answered?
Britain and France are going to insist on the restoration of Polish sovereignty in all of the pre-1939 Polish territories that Germany occupied as well as on a German withdrawal from Czechia (probably minus the Sudetenland) and Danzig--in addition to a German withdrawal from all of its western conquests, of course. Britain and France would also probably insist on the extradition of all surviving Nazi war criminals so that they could put them on trial for war crimes. Also, Britain and France would probably demand some reparations for countries that were invaded by Germany--specifically Poland, the Low Countries, Denmark, and Norway. Would the new, post-Nazi German leadership have actually been willing to pay such a price for peace?
 

pugsville

Ad Honorem
Oct 2010
9,226
#4
Democracies cannot just turn war mobilization off and on. Once going to war teh issue has be settled in no uncertain terms. Once there is peace de mobilization followed. Nothing less than a pretty decisive victory is acceptable. Poland and Czechoslovakia restored.
 
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Futurist

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May 2014
19,606
SoCal
#5
Democracies cannot just turn war mobilization off and on. Once going to war teh issue has be settled in no uncertain terms. Once there is peace de mobilization followed. Nothing less than a pretty decisive victory is acceptable.
Yeah, that makes sense.

Poland and Czechoslovakia restored.
If Britain and France insist on Czechoslovakia being restored within its borders of 1937, then Germany might very well fight to the bitter end--especially if Britain and France are going to demand the expulsion of the Sudeten Germans from the Sudetenland after it is returned to Czechoslovakia. I simply can't see any German government--even a non-Nazi one--agreeing to the expulsion of three million Germans who are already a part of the German Reich.
 

pugsville

Ad Honorem
Oct 2010
9,226
#6
Y
If Britain and France insist on Czechoslovakia being restored within its borders of 1937, then Germany might very well fight to the bitter end--especially if Britain and France are going to demand the expulsion of the Sudeten Germans from the Sudetenland after it is returned to Czechoslovakia. I simply can't see any German government--even a non-Nazi one--agreeing to the expulsion of three million Germans who are already a part of the German Reich.
The Democracies need to unequivocally totally defeat Germany. This is pretty akin to the Versailles treaty problem in 1918.

The Demorcaies are going to be tempted to fight til total unconditiopnal surrender almost regardless. Anything else and it's a re-run of Versallies.
 
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Mar 2019
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Kansas
#7
Britain and France are going to insist on the restoration of Polish sovereignty in all of the pre-1939 Polish territories that Germany occupied as well as on a German withdrawal from Czechia (probably minus the Sudetenland) and Danzig--in addition to a German withdrawal from all of its western conquests, of course. Britain and France would also probably insist on the extradition of all surviving Nazi war criminals so that they could put them on trial for war crimes. Also, Britain and France would probably demand some reparations for countries that were invaded by Germany--specifically Poland, the Low Countries, Denmark, and Norway. Would the new, post-Nazi German leadership have actually been willing to pay such a price for peace?
A very tough question. Stalin is probably going to do his level best to upset the applecart. I am not sure how much restitution the German economy had left it in. The level of military spending had been well beyond the capacity of her GDP to absorb it. So I guess it all comes down to what the allies wanted for Germanys future in a post war Europe
 
Oct 2016
124
Ashland
#8
Interesting Thread. 2 what-ifs is perhaps one too many.
What does seem fairly likely to me is that the Wehrmacht is going to back another horse, so a coup would be a strong possibility.
As for restoring the status quo ante bellum...well, this is a good argument for not ceding an inch to bullies(Putin these days fits the bill pretty well) in the first place.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
19,606
SoCal
#9
The Democracies need to unequivocally totally defeat Germany. This is pretty akin to the Versailles treaty problem in 1918.

The Demorcaies are going to be tempted to fight til total unconditiopnal surrender almost regardless. Anything else and it's a re-run of Versallies.
Would Britain and France actually be willing to suffer an extremely massive amount of casualties to get Germany to capitulate, though?

Also, why didn't Britain and France announce unconditional surrender as a war aim in 1939-1940?