If the Mexican American war never happened, would Mexico be one of the richest countries in the world today?

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,879
Portugal
Everything that plaged every Hispanic-cultured country in the Western Hemisphere also plaged Mexico but in a grand scale.
How so?

And I am asking this to really know your opinion, as a person from the USA, how is a culture “plaged”? I worked two years in Spain, I already visited other Hispanic countries and have a reasonable interest on Spanish and Hispanic history which is fundamental to understand the Portuguese history.
 
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mark87

Ad Honorem
Jan 2014
2,080
Santiago de Chile
The Spanish had literal mountains of gold and silver carved from the ground from the New World, they lost it all in a few centuries, we are talking about a brutal amount of precious metals and other items, an entire mountain filled with silver in Potosi, Bolivia. Again they lost it all, the Spanish speaking countries in this hemisphere sadly inherited this worldview, why work if I can exploit someone else? Why develop industry if we can just sell cash crops in bulk so that the elite can live like kings and the rest basically starve.
While there are several factors at play in the economic woes of Latin America, some of which are not even Latin America's fault, the cultural view of work ethic is noticeably different or used to be regarding the developed world.
It's like giving someone with bad budgeting skills and money management a winning lottery ticket, if they don't somehow learn managing skills they will likely lose it all very quickly. I don't think mid 19th century Mexico would have done a better job administering those territories. Mexico would still be poor, and so would Nevada, Arizona, California, parts of Utah, Texas, Colorado and Wyoming.

(Disclaimer I know very well there are very hard working and responsible people everywhere and certainly in Spanish speaking countries)
 
Jun 2013
501
Connecticut
How so?

And I am asking this to really know your opinion, as a person from the USA, how is a culture “plaged”? I worked two years in Spain, I already visited other Hispanic countries and have a reasonable interest on Spanish and Hispanic history which is fundamental to understand the Portuguese history.
If you read the paragraph right above you'll know what I mean. You can pretty much substitute any othe Hispanic Western Hemisphere country in place of Mexico and it will pretty much fit the same pattern.
I too have worked in Hispanic culture countries plus I've got family members who are Hispanic. So I've not only read histories but have "oral histories" ---the stories --- to enrich book info. It's amazing. The last stories were from co-workers in the Dominican Republic. Stories from their folks and grandparents. Stuff you'll never read in the books. That's just one example.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,879
Portugal
If you read the paragraph right above you'll know what I mean. You can pretty much substitute any othe Hispanic Western Hemisphere country in place of Mexico and it will pretty much fit the same pattern.

I too have worked in Hispanic culture countries plus I've got family members who are Hispanic. So I've not only read histories but have "oral histories" ---the stories --- to enrich book info. It's amazing. The last stories were from co-workers in the Dominican Republic. Stories from their folks and grandparents. Stuff you'll never read in the books. That's just one example.
You mean this one:

Already by 1840 Mexico had already experienced internal revolts, republics, empires, economic instability, in fighting between federalist liberals and monarchical conservatives, isolation among states and the central government, the emplaced wretched hierarchical caste system and the apex of unmitigated corruption.
?

That one was about Mexico, but than you generalized to all the Hispanic countries (for instance mentioning the caste system to Spain is not applicable), and made a kind of law, that was when it came my doubt. So no, I was, am, not sure, even if I can infer.

Also didn’t understood the example you gave about the Dominican Republic, since you just mentioned that stories were told, you didn’t gave an exemple.

Anyway books can have all that. Phrases like “Stuff you'll never read in the books” are understandable but also odd, since that all that is “oral” can be written, even if the orality and the direct contact with the narrator can have a stronger and not filtered influence in our perceptions.
 
Jun 2013
501
Connecticut
You mean this one:

?

That one was about Mexico, but than you generalized to all the Hispanic countries (for instance mentioning the caste system to Spain is not applicable), and made a kind of law, that was when it came my doubt. So no, I was, am, not sure, even if I can infer.

Also didn’t understood the example you gave about the Dominican Republic, since you just mentioned that stories were told, you didn’t gave an exemple.

Anyway books can have all that. Phrases like “Stuff you'll never read in the books” are understandable but also odd, since that all that is “oral” can be written, even if the orality and the direct contact with the narrator can have a stronger and not filtered influence in our perceptions.
I only refered to Hispanic cultured countries in the Western Hemisphere, not Spain.
I still stand by my generalization of lumping Hispanic cultured countries. Pretty much every one has a "Mexico type" history behind it.
In the DR, much of its modern history is the Trujillo era. On one hand there were great improvements in health, education, transportation, housing, manufacturing. Families had portraits of Trujillo along side Jesus. The regime was Nazi-style repressive and corrupt. If you read about the DR after Trujillo you'll see overthows, little civil war, ethnic cleansing, newer style repression, loss of civil liberties, corrupt elections. As we move into the turn of the 21st c. things have gotten much better. Aside from rampant crime and a corrupt judicial system, for example, the infusion of foreign manufacturing has made the DR a little economic powerhouse.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,879
Portugal
I only refered to Hispanic cultured countries in the Western Hemisphere, not Spain.
I still stand by my generalization of lumping Hispanic cultured countries. Pretty much every one has a "Mexico type" history behind it.
In the DR, much of its modern history is the Trujillo era. On one hand there were great improvements in health, education, transportation, housing, manufacturing. Families had portraits of Trujillo along side Jesus. The regime was Nazi-style repressive and corrupt. If you read about the DR after Trujillo you'll see overthows, little civil war, ethnic cleansing, newer style repression, loss of civil liberties, corrupt elections. As we move into the turn of the 21st c. things have gotten much better. Aside from rampant crime and a corrupt judicial system, for example, the infusion of foreign manufacturing has made the DR a little economic powerhouse.
Ok. Thanks. Now I understood it better.
 
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