If the Ottoman Empire would've avoided WWI, how many Turks would have settled in the Empire's Arab and Kurdish lands?

Futurist

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May 2014
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#1
If the Ottoman Empire would have remained neutral in World War I and thus survived the war, how many Turks would have settled in the Empire's Arab and Kurdish lands during the 20th century?
 
Apr 2017
1,484
U.S.A.
#2
If the Ottoman Empire would have remained neutral in World War I and thus survived the war, how many Turks would have settled in the Empire's Arab and Kurdish lands during the 20th century?
Probably few. Since WW1 Turkey hasn't made a significant effort to settle in the Kurdish territory they have now. Of note is the Ottomans did have a policy of settling muslim refugees from Russia in parts of their empire.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
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#3
Probably few. Since WW1 Turkey hasn't made a significant effort to settle in the Kurdish territory they have now.
That's a good point. That said, though, their Kurdish territories don't have a coastline while their Arab territories do. Also, some of their Arab territories have a lot of oil.

Of note is the Ottomans did have a policy of settling muslim refugees from Russia in parts of their empire.
Yep. However, was this only in Anatolia or in other parts of the empire as well--and if so, in which parts?
 
Apr 2017
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#4
That's a good point. That said, though, their Kurdish territories don't have a coastline while their Arab territories do. Also, some of their Arab territories have a lot of oil.



Yep. However, was this only in Anatolia or in other parts of the empire as well--and if so, in which parts?
Oil wasn't discovered in the arab territories till after ww1.
Parts in Anatolia but also in the arab territories, including what is now Israel, Syria, Lebanon and Jordan.
 
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Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
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#6
Oil wasn't discovered in the arab territories till after ww1.

Parts in Anatolia but also in the arab territories, including what is now Israel, Syria, Lebanon and Jordan.
Oil was discovered an explored in “Iraq” previously to WWI. And since they speak Arabic there, it is an Arab territory.

Calouste Sarkis Gulbenkian was an important businessman in the development of the oil industry there: Iraq Petroleum Company - Wikipedia
 
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Apr 2017
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#8
Yes, but we're talking about the entire 20th century here.

Do you know how many settled outside of Anatolia?
Circassians were the main ones, chechens, Nogai and others fled there as well.

I quote this from Wikipedia:

It has been estimated that the Ottoman Empire imported some 200,000 slaves—mainly Circassians (many were refugees)—between 1800 and 1909.[62] The Adyghes who were settled by the Ottomans in various near-border settlements across the empire, ended up living across many territories in the Middle East. At the time these belonged to the Ottoman Empire and are now located in the following countries:

  • Turkey, which has the largest Adyghe population in the world. The Adyghe settled in three main regions in Turkey: Samsun, along the shores of the Black Sea; the region near the city of Ankara, the region near the city of Kayseri, and in the western part of the country near the region of Istanbul. This latter region experienced a severe earthquake in 1999. Many Adyghe played key roles in the Ottoman army and also participated in the Turkish War of Independence.
  • Syria. Most of the Adyghe who immigrated to Syria settled in the Golan Heights. Prior to the Six-Day War, the Adyghe people were the majority group in the Golan Heights region—their number at that time is estimated at 30,000. The most prominent settlement in the Golan was the town of Quneitra. The total number of Circassians in Syria is estimated to be between 50,000 and 100,000.[63] In 2013, the Syrian Circassians said they were exploring returning to Circassia, as tensions between the Baath government and the opposition forces escalated. Circassians from different parts of Syria, such as Damascus, have moved back to the Golan Heights, believed to be safer. Some refugees have been reportedly killed by shelling. Circassians have been lobbying the Russian and Israeli governments to help evacuate refugees from Syria. Some visas were issued by Russia.[64]
  • Israel and Palestine. The Adyghe initially settled in three places—in Kfar Kama, Rehaniya, and in the region of Hadera. Due to a malaria epidemic, the Adyghe settlement near Hadera was eventually abandoned. Though Sunni Muslim, Adyghe are seen as a loyal minority within Israel, who serve in the armed forces.[65][66][67]

    Circassian Guards in Jordan
  • Jordan. The Adyghe had a major role in the history of the Kingdom of Jordan.[68][69] Over the years, various Adyghe have served in distinguished roles in the kingdom of Jordan. An Adyghe has served as a prime minister (Sa'id al-Mufti), ministers (commonly at least one minister should represent the Circassians in each cabinet), high rank officers, etc., and due to their important role in the history of Jordan, Adyghe form the Hashemites honour guard at the royal palaces. They represented Jordan in the Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo in 2010, joining other honour guards such as the Airborne Ceremonial Unit.[70][71] Jordanian Circassians have several clusterings, most notably Sweileh in Amman.
  • Iraq. The Adyghe came to Iraq directly from Circassia. They settled in all parts of Iraq—from north to south—but most of all in Iraq's capital Baghdad. Many Adyghe also settled in Kerkuk, Diyala, Fallujah, and other places. Circassians played a major role in different periods throughout Iraq's history, and made great contributions to political and military institutions in the country, to the Iraqi Army in particular. Several Iraqi prime ministers have been of Circassian descent.
 
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Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
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Portugal
#9
It's interesting that the Ottomans would allow an Armenian to handle such an important national resource.
Gulbenkian gained quite soon British citizenship (well before the WWI), and his family was already in the oil business. So even if he fled the Ottoman Empire due some massacres, he was on other level of most of the Armenians.

There was a time, not sure when, probably in the interwar period, that it was said that he had one of the greatest fortunes in the world.

Anyway he is quite famous in Portugal due to his Foundation. During the “New State” the foundation had mobile libraries in trucks that went from town to town loaning books.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
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#10
Gulbenkian gained quite soon British citizenship (well before the WWI), and his family was already in the oil business. So even if he fled the Ottoman Empire due some massacres, he was on other level of most of the Armenians.

There was a time, not sure when, probably in the interwar period, that it was said that he had one of the greatest fortunes in the world.

Anyway he is quite famous in Portugal due to his Foundation. During the “New State” the foundation had mobile libraries in trucks that went from town to town loaning books.
So, he was a philanthropist?