If the U.S. is on the verge of losing in Afghanistan, should it try partitioning it?

If the U.S. is on the verge of losing in Afghanistan, should it try partitioning it?


  • Total voters
    28

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
20,936
SoCal
#1
As you know, the U.S. has been fighting a war in Afghanistan against the Taliban for the last 16.5 years. We officially got into Afghanistan in order to eliminate the safe haven that the Taliban provided to al-Qaeda, but another large part of our mission in Afghanistan was to modernize the country--specifically by bringing modern technology, schools, and women's rights there. Obviously our success in regards to this has been only partial, though--with the results primarily visible in Afghan cities.

Anyway, my question is this--if the U.S. will be on the verge of losing the war in Afghanistan (something which I don't think is true yet considering that the war there currently appears to be a stalemate), should the U.S. aim to work with pro-U.S. Afghan politicians and military officials to partition the country?

Here's an ethnic map of Afghanistan:



The Taliban appears to have the strongest support among Afghan Pashtuns (who primarily--albeit not exclusively--live in southern Afghanistan).

Thus, do you think that a losing U.S. should try to create a separate state (or more than one separate state) in northern Afghanistan in order to prevent the Taliban from seizing all of Afghanistan and in order to allow the U.S. and U.S. influence to continue to have a presence in a large part of Afghanistan?

Any thoughts on this?
 
Dec 2012
1,560
U.S.A.
#2
Afghanistan has a long history of not wanting foreigners on their soil. I don't see how the U.S. partitioning it would not invite jihadists to set up camp and plan more attacks. Even if the partition was done by an Afghani government people would say that the U.S. was meddling, and they'd be correct.
 
Dec 2013
345
USA
#3
I think we, the Americans, should have pulled out long ago. as long as they don't bother us, leave them alone. Some in our government want it to be a better place. But it's not going to happen. Let's pull out and watch it go back to the Dark Ages. They harbor terrorists again that level one of our cities? make it a parking lot from the air.
 

Belgarion

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,707
Australia
#4
Afghanistan has a long history of not wanting foreigners on their soil. I don't see how the U.S. partitioning it would not invite jihadists to set up camp and plan more attacks. Even if the partition was done by an Afghani government people would say that the U.S. was meddling, and they'd be correct.
This. The smart thing to have done was to slap the Taliban hard, teach them a lesson about sheltering terrorists/exporting their problems, and then leave. Staying on to 'nation build' was never going to work.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
20,936
SoCal
#5
Afghanistan has a long history of not wanting foreigners on their soil. I don't see how the U.S. partitioning it would not invite jihadists to set up camp and plan more attacks. Even if the partition was done by an Afghani government people would say that the U.S. was meddling, and they'd be correct.
Yes, the U.S. would be meddling, but it would be meddling on the side of national self-determination.

I think we, the Americans, should have pulled out long ago. as long as they don't bother us, leave them alone. Some in our government want it to be a better place. But it's not going to happen. Let's pull out and watch it go back to the Dark Ages. They harbor terrorists again that level one of our cities? make it a parking lot from the air.
If a majority of Afghans in certain areas don't want to live under Taliban rule, though, why exactly should they have to do this?
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
20,936
SoCal
#6
This. The smart thing to have done was to slap the Taliban hard, teach them a lesson about sheltering terrorists/exporting their problems, and then leave. Staying on to 'nation build' was never going to work.
Oh, nation-building in Afghanistan is certainly a challenge. That said, though, the Taliban regime was extremely bad--oppressing women, banning modern technology, banning music and photography, et cetera. Indeed, one would think that there might have been a different course of action which didn't involve keeping the Taliban in power in Afghanistan--specifically restoring the Afghan monarchy after overthrowing the Taliban.
 
Oct 2013
14,533
Europix
#7
I really have to ask: why ?

Why should US partition another country ?

Had Afghans participated in the last US elections ? Is US government representing Afghan people in any way, did it received democratically any mandate from the Afghan people ?
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
20,936
SoCal
#9
I really have to ask: why ?

Why should US partition another country ?

Had Afghans participated in the last US elections ? Is US government representing Afghan people in any way, did it received democratically any mandate from the Afghan people ?
I'm trying to think about the well-being of the Afghan people here. I'm presuming that not all of them want to live under Taliban rule.
 
Apr 2017
1,484
U.S.A.
#10
Partitioning Afghanistan would have little positive effect, it would only set the factions allied with America against each other; meanwhile the Taliban would continue to try to take over the entire country.
Then there's how to partition it. What about the Uzbek, Tajik and Turkmen areas? Do you give them to Uzbekistan, Tajikistan and Turkmenistan? Even though they haven't been joined with them in hundreds of years? This may just ignite a war with other countries that could bring Russia into the conflict.
 
Likes: Neutral

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