If the USSR creates an independent Transylvanian state after the end of WWII, will it reunify with Romania after the end of the Cold War?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
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SoCal
#1
If the USSR creates an independent Transylvanian state after the end of WWII, will this state reunify with Romania after the end of the Cold War or remain independent like Moldova?

BTW, I know that this scenario is very unlikely, but perhaps not completely impossible if there is no King Michael's Coup in Romania. The USSR's logic would be that it would prefer to have both Hungary and Romania be weak and thus decide that neither one of them should have Transylvania. This could be viewed as proper punishment for their role as Allies of Nazi Germany during WWII.

Thoughts?
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,022
SoCal
#2
Also, I wonder if Hungary would have actually threatened to go to war with Romania in this scenario in the event of a Transylvanian reunion with Romania. After all, I think that something like a quarter of Transylvania's population was Hungarian--though most of them were located very far from the Hungarian border.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,022
SoCal
#4
Makes sense.

BTW, I honestly don't get why Moldovans don't want to rejoin Romania. They would be much, much better off under Romanian rule. Heck, Moldova was the most illiterate part of Romania even back when it was under Romanian rule.
 
Apr 2017
1,505
U.S.A.
#5
Makes sense.

BTW, I honestly don't get why Moldovans don't want to rejoin Romania. They would be much, much better off under Romanian rule. Heck, Moldova was the most illiterate part of Romania even back when it was under Romanian rule.
The Soviets promoted a separate identity for the Moldovans, similar to how Macedonia is different from Bulgaria. The Moldovan alphabet is Cyrillic, while Romanian in Latin. Moldova also has separatist problems with Transnistria and Gaguzia. If they were to join Romania Russia may use this as an excuse to intervene and "liberate" these regions.
 
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Tulun

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
3,851
Western Eurasia
#6
Hungary wouldn't go for a war in the 1990s, it wouldn't have the capability and not even the desire. Depending on the policies of this independent Transylvania, like if Hungarian is also an equal co-official language there (maybe German too, if the Saxons wouldn't be sold in this scenario), Székelys have their territorial autonomy, probably the local Hungarians themselves wouldn't want to join either with Hungary. There was always a strong regional identity among the Hungarians there, and TBH the Hungarian occupation in 1941 also left some bitter taste among some segments of Transylvanian Hungarians.
I don't think Romania would do that either, 40 years of independence could also strengthen further the regional identity of Transylvanian Romanians and increase the cultural differences, and an independent Transylvania would be a force to reckon on its own, it would have now around a population of ~ 7 million (or even more), rich in resources, Romania would have around 12-13 million, Hungary 9,7 million (+ Moldova 3,4 million). IMO Transylvania could have the potential under this circumstance to develope a Swiss like independent identity, of course in reality politicans always have the capability to screw up things :D
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,022
SoCal
#7
The Soviets promoted a separate identity for the Moldovans, similar to how Macedonia is different from Bulgaria. The Moldovan alphabet is Cyrillic, while Romanian in Latin. Moldova also has separatist problems with Transnistria and Gaguzia. If they were to join Romania Russia may use this as an excuse to intervene and "liberate" these regions.
Why exactly should Moldova care about these two regions, though? I mean, the former is already out of its control and the latter is probably economically worthless.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,022
SoCal
#8
Hungary wouldn't go for a war in the 1990s, it wouldn't have the capability and not even the desire. Depending on the policies of this independent Transylvania, like if Hungarian is also an equal co-official language there (maybe German too, if the Saxons wouldn't be sold in this scenario), Székelys have their territorial autonomy, probably the local Hungarians themselves wouldn't want to join either with Hungary. There was always a strong regional identity among the Hungarians there, and TBH the Hungarian occupation in 1941 also left some bitter taste among some segments of Transylvanian Hungarians.
I don't think Romania would do that either, 40 years of independence could also strengthen further the regional identity of Transylvanian Romanians and increase the cultural differences, and an independent Transylvania would be a force to reckon on its own, it would have now around a population of ~ 7 million (or even more), rich in resources, Romania would have around 12-13 million, Hungary 9,7 million (+ Moldova 3,4 million). IMO Transylvania could have the potential under this circumstance to develope a Swiss like independent identity, of course in reality politicans always have the capability to screw up things :D
I would still think that the Saxons would have wanted a better life in Germany, no? After all, Communism is going to retard Transylvania's economic development.

BTW, what were the grievances of Transylvanian Hungarians against Hungarian rule after 1941?

I agree with the rest of your points here, though.
 

Tulun

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
3,851
Western Eurasia
#9
Everybody would rather want to have a better life in Western Germany than to live in the commie block :D it wouldn't necessarily mean that an independent commie Transylvania would also let them go.

Regarding the griievances, many in the local Hungarian elite were disappointed in 1941 that the occupying Hungarian forces preferred to bring in and appoint officials in the administration from the mainland and not from among the Transylvanian Hungarians, plus those behaved arrogantly (the same was true in upper Hungary/Southern Slovakia that returned in the first Vienna decision), often looking down the locals, so many Transylvanians felt that they are sidelined. Now this may be largely forgotten, but immedietly after the ww 2 it could still be a fresh bitter memory.
 
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Oct 2013
14,533
Europix
#10
Why exactly should Moldova care about these two regions, though? I mean, the former is already out of its control and the latter is probably economically worthless.
Because today's Moldova it's already halved of it's territory. One example.

If my memory doesn't fail me, the first (or one of the early) capital of Moldova is in Ukraine today. Would be a second example (if I'm not wrong on that).

As for why it doesn't reunite: Moldovans aren't an absolute majority, plus, they can (could?) aquire Romanian citizenship, thus having access to Romania and EU.