If the USSR creates an independent Transylvanian state after the end of WWII, will it reunify with Romania after the end of the Cold War?

Apr 2017
1,186
U.S.A.
#11
Why exactly should Moldova care about these two regions, though? I mean, the former is already out of its control and the latter is probably economically worthless.
Most countries don't like losing territory, it is a sign of weakness that may invite further attack. Look at Poland after the first partition, it lead to a second and third.
Also Moldova is a former Soviet state, Russia doesn't want anymore states to fall into western orbit. And again Moldova feels like its own country now, like Macedonia, Cyprus, Montenegro, Austria and others.
 
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Ficino

Ad Honorem
Apr 2012
6,913
Romania
#12
If my memory doesn't fail me, the first (or one of the early) capital of Moldova is in Ukraine today. Would be a second example (if I'm not wrong on that).
All the historical capitals of Moldova are on the territory of Romania, the last one was Iași. If by "Moldova" you (wrongly) mean the so called Republic of Moldova, it has had no other capital than the actual one, Chișinău.
 
Oct 2013
14,080
Europix
#13
All the historical capitals of Moldova are on the territory of Romania, the last one was Iași. If by "Moldova" you (wrongly) mean the so called Republic of Moldova, it has had no other capital than the actual one, Chișinău.
No, I was talking about "Moldova", not about the "Republic of Moldova".

Thank You for clarifying the capital side (nothing improves with age, not even my memory!)
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,070
SoCal
#15
Everybody would rather want to have a better life in Western Germany than to live in the commie block :D it wouldn't necessarily mean that an independent commie Transylvania would also let them go.
True, but please keep in mind that as soon as Transylvania's doors are going to open, Transylvanian Germans are likely to rush for the exits en masse. AFAIK, this is what happened in real life--once Romania opened its doors and allowed people to emigrate, the overwhelming majority of Romanian Germans left. Ditto for Soviet Germans.

Regarding the griievances, many in the local Hungarian elite were disappointed in 1941 that the occupying Hungarian forces preferred to bring in and appoint officials in the administration from the mainland and not from among the Transylvanian Hungarians, plus those behaved arrogantly (the same was true in upper Hungary/Southern Slovakia that returned in the first Vienna decision), often looking down the locals, so many Transylvanians felt that they are sidelined. Now this may be largely forgotten, but immedietly after the ww 2 it could still be a fresh bitter memory.
That makes sense. Of course, I wonder if Romania has a better record in regards to this. Do a lot of people in Transylvania's administration nowadays consist of Transylvanian Romanians?
 

Tulun

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
3,769
Western Eurasia
#16
True, but please keep in mind that as soon as Transylvania's doors are going to open, Transylvanian Germans are likely to rush for the exits en masse. AFAIK, this is what happened in real life--once Romania opened its doors and allowed people to emigrate, the overwhelming majority of Romanian Germans left. Ditto for Soviet Germans.
It would depend on the economic performance of this Transylvanian state, how big part of them would rush to leave the country. How low would be the living standards, would it also pursue a more autarch policy as did Ceausescu's Romania (which then resulted in lower living standards relative to other commie countries), or would they try to be more like a happier barrack as was in Kádár's Hungary, spending more on consumer goods? And also how integrated would they be in the country as a constituting nationality and how would they benefit from their social class status. I think their will to emigrate would also depend on how well would they be coopted in the running of the country, would they feel that it is their nation too where they have a word, or just a repressed/marginalized minority.
In communist theory the worker class would have a privilagized position in the dictatorship of the proletariat. Among Transylvanian Germans 57,1% of them were working class in 1956, as opposed to the Hungarians where only 32,3% were working class and Romanians, where it was just 23,8%.
60,4 % of Romanians, 48 % of Hungarians and 23,1 % of the Germans were peasants. The remaining categories were intellectual/freelancer/clercs (here among all 3 nationalities 12-13% belonged to this class), and artisans. So just based on Marxist-Leninist theory Germans who made up some 6 % of the total population of Transylvania in this time should have a bigger share in leadership, proportionally more party members etc since more than half of them were proletars. But this is just a speculation, who knows how would power struggles turn out at this time, communist Transylvania would also follow a Stalinist course in the 1950s and can't predict the later development.



That makes sense. Of course, I wonder if Romania has a better record in regards to this. Do a lot of people in Transylvania's administration nowadays consist of Transylvanian Romanians?
I don't know.
 
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sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
4,383
Sydney
#17
Moldova is Europe anus ,
it's a kaleidoscope of people who don't particularly like each others
it's economy depend on the remittances of its young people working in Russia or Ukraine
their governance is corrupt in an inefficient way , not even good at stealing

I like the place !
any leader could pass its time asleep and do better
 
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Oct 2013
14,080
Europix
#18
it's economy depend on the remittances of its young people working in Russia or Ukraine
It's difficult to have reliable data, but the estimates are half-half: approximately the same number of young (and less young) are in EU as in Russia.

Estimates (again) is that a quarter of the PIB comes from the money sent home.
 

Ficino

Ad Honorem
Apr 2012
6,913
Romania
#20