If you could a change single historical event, what would it be and why?

Aug 2019
62
New York
#1
This thread will be more of a thought experiment than actually history, but humor me - I'm a bit off color.

The march of time is dauntless and unrelenting...but what if it wasn't? Not entirely. What if you could alter one event, a moment in time...but only one.

What might be the "ideal"/intended repercussions of altering such an event? What might be the downfalls? I'm interested in the thought processes behind these hypothetical decisions, especially.


~M
 
Likes: Futurist
Oct 2016
1,144
Merryland
#4
JFK doesn't get assassinated.
no LBJ as president. no escalation of Vietnam war. gradual rapprochement with Castro (apparently he was already fed up with the USSR).
gradual civil rights instead of 'great society' spending spree.
60s could have been much calmer and less provocative. no Kent State shooting; no Weathermen.

footnote; JFK and brother RFK were very anti-Mafia. their campaign ended with LBJ's presidency. Had JFK lived they might have wiped out, or at least greatly reduced, organized crime in the USA (lots of theories that it was the mob that orchestrated the assassination). our cities might have been much better off.
 
Likes: Modor
Jul 2019
91
Pale Blue Dot - Moonshine Quadrant
#5
I would like to reverse the decision to remove Jefferson’s passage on slavery from his original draft of the Declaration of Independence.

That deadly moral compromise in 1776 carried over into the American Constitution in 1787.

That a slave owner wanted to include an indictment of slavery would have been a powerful factor in the explosive debate that surely would have followed.

Of course there is no way to know what would have happened had Jefferson's words been retained, but it can be powerfully argued that slavery destroyed the original American Republic and what came out of the Civil War was a radically different thing.

Jefferson's Rough Draft included:

he has waged cruel war against human nature itself, violating it's most sacred rights of life & liberty in the persons of a distant people who never offended him, captivating & carrying them into slavery in another hemisphere, or to incur miserable death in their transportation thither. this piratical warfare, the opprobrium of infidel powers, is the warfare of the CHRISTIAN king of Great Britain. determined to keep open a market where MEN should be bought & sold, he has prostituted his negative for suppressing every legislative attempt to prohibit or to restrain this execrable commerce: and that this assemblage of horrors might want no fact of distinguished die, he is now exciting those very people to rise in arms among us, and to purchase that liberty of which he has deprived them, & murdering the people upon whom he also obtruded them; thus paying off former crimes committed against the liberties of one people, with crimes which he urges them to commit against the lives of another.
 
Aug 2019
62
New York
#6
I would change the time in university when I got thrown out of a girl's apartment because I didn't realize that she was waiting for me to make a move on her.
Ahh, so you wish you were more intelligent? What exact moment in time do you think you’d have to change to alter that?
 

Maki

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
3,419
Republika Srpska
#9
1918 formation of Yugoslavia. Serbia should have accepted what was offered to her by the Treaty of London and be done with it. Creating Yugoslavia only caused increased ethnic tensions and eventually bloody wars. Both Yugoslavias ended disastrously proving that it was an experiment that never should have been attempted.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,197
SoCal
#10
This thread will be more of a thought experiment than actually history, but humor me - I'm a bit off color.

The march of time is dauntless and unrelenting...but what if it wasn't? Not entirely. What if you could alter one event, a moment in time...but only one.

What might be the "ideal"/intended repercussions of altering such an event? What might be the downfalls? I'm interested in the thought processes behind these hypothetical decisions, especially.


~M
Personally, I'd really like to prevent the Holocaust because a lot of my Jewish relatives got murdered in it and also because more surviving Ashkenazi Jews might have meant that a bit more technological innovation and scientific research occurs over the last 80 years. Interestingly enough, a very easy way to prevent about half of the Holocaust would have been for Stalin to deport all Soviet Jews deep into the interior of the Soviet Union sometime in 1940 or early 1941. Of course, it would have been even better had Stalin asked Hitler to deport the Polish Jews en masse into the Soviet Union as well so that Stalin could include all of them in these hypothetical deportations into the interior of the Soviet Union. It's quite ironic, but such a mass deportation could have literally saved millions of Jewish lives.