If you were in charge of waging a war against guerrillas

Oct 2011
833
Kill, preferably quietly disappear, the leadership.....intellectual or religious, financial and strategic. Do not jail, only eliminate.
 
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sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
4,995
Sydney
going after the leadership and make sure there is a power struggle where they fight each others
discredit the most likely to succeed , fragment the factions to a multitude of sub-groups
co-opt or whip out the most moderates , leaving the truly atrocious for last
then with intense patrolling , permanent occupation of the most agreeable areas , give good justice and substantial reward to the local leaders
 

Edric Streona

Ad Honorem
Feb 2016
4,481
Japan
I’d follow the British strategy in Malayan Emergency.

Isolate terrorists from the people, hold ground, try and avoid massacring people, try and turn prisoners back..
 

Kevinmeath

Ad Honoris
May 2011
14,032
Navan, Ireland
Paulinus Sir, I am not lacking in imagination. When you imagine an average guerrilla, you imagine IRA which was honourable enough to warn civilians when it planted .......................
You mean like at Omagh where their 'warning' actually directed people to the Bombs?

Or in Birmingham where such short notice was given it has in reality useless or Warrington where they were so vague as to be useless?

It does however have the advantage that they can claim that they gave warnings in their propaganda.

Urban guerrilla warfare is really all about propaganda
 

redcoat

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
7,810
Stockport Cheshire UK
I would pile a load of bananas in a clearing in the jungle and then wait in ambush for the gorillas ? ?
;)
 
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Scaeva

Ad Honorem
Oct 2012
5,630
I’d follow the British strategy in Malayan Emergency.

Isolate terrorists from the people, hold ground, try and avoid massacring people, try and turn prisoners back..
All of that is good but the Malayan Emergency was pretty much an ideal situation for counter-insurgency. The rebels did not have popular support, could not count on direct foreign intervention on their behalf, and drew most of their support from an ethnic minority that was often discriminated against by the majority. (making the road to gaining popular support even steeper)

Of course an argument could be made that one shouldn't intervene in foreign civil wars / insurgencies unless the conditions are close to ideal.
 

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
4,995
Sydney
the malayan insurgency was mostly made of ethnic Chinese , it wasn't too difficult to set the malays against them
there were a few pogroms ,
the Chinese population was directly threatened with obliteration and as mostly city dwellers had very little support in the countryside

same happened to Che Guevara in Bolivia ,
they had very little support from the local peasants and pretty much starved , moving blind without good intel
 
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