Imjin War

Dec 2018
25
East
#31
It's a translation of a long time ago.
Joseon Navy's Tactics and Reception and Mate's mathematics.

1. Tactics and tactics

During the Japanese Invasion of Korea in 1592, the original form of the Joseon navy was basically the same as the Joseon army. They are also operated using the techniques in Owijinboup.

If we are Admiral Yi Sun-sin, there is Crane wing formation, which is the basic tactic in Owiejinboup.

In fact, Crane wing formation was not a suitable tactic for firing.
If you make a mistake because you've been shot in a diagonal line, you can attack our troops.
So only skilled soldiers are available.

So over time, they used Jangsa formation more than Crane wing formation.

This genuine type, called jangsa formation or lila jangsa formation, was optimized before the artillery attack, so gradually, it became more and more focused on jangsa formation.
 
Last edited:
Dec 2018
25
East
#32
It's a translation of a long time ago.
Joseon Navy's Tactics and Reception and Mate's mathematics.

1. Tactics and tactics

During the Japanese Invasion of Korea in 1592, the original form of the Joseon navy was basically the same as the Joseon army. They are also operated using the techniques in Owijinboup.

If we are Admiral Yi Sun-sin, there is Crane wing formation, which is the basic tactic in Owiejinboup.

In fact, Crane wing formation was not a suitable tactic for firing.
If you make a mistake because you've been shot in a diagonal line, you can attack our troops.
So only skilled soldiers are available.

So over time, they used Jangsa formation more than Crane wing formation.

This genuine type, called jangsa formation or lila jangsa formation, was optimized before the artillery attack, so gradually, it became more and more focused on jangsa formation.
2. Signalling system

Signal system has an audible and a visual signal system

First, the auditory signal system communicates through sound.

Unfortunately, there are almost no hard-pressed data on the signal system during the Japanese Invasion of Korea in 1592, so I have to rely on a piece of record.

The auditory system has been used a lot in the past.
Since gunpowder weapons appeared during the Japanese Invasion of Korea in 1592, the visual signaling system is more preferred over the auditory signal system over time.

However, Yi Sun-sin's record says that he blew his trumpet three times before the Korean navy made the debut. According to the tactical books written during the late Joseon Dynasty,

When you blow the first trumpet, the cook makes rice, the soldiers clean up their luggage,

When the second trumpet blows, you eat, pack your bags, leave the door,

When the third trumpet blows, it is said that it stands where it wants to strike camp and waits for an order.

However, the signal system used by the Korean navy was a visual signal system.

According to Owijinboup, there's a way to signal with flags and a way to signal with Sinjijeon.

Sinjijeon is usually used to report when an enemy ship is found on a patrol ship.

For example, Admiral Yi Sun-sin's record shows that when a patrol boat found an enemy ship during the Battle of Okpo, it sent out a signal.

It is now a signal system using flags.

Choyogi(초요기): Usually used to stop naval battles, or when a captain calls a king's elders, the flag was set up to stop fighting during the Battle of Okpo.

Captain's Flag(대장기): a captain's flag

Whee(휘): They say it was the most important military command.

It is used to command each subordinate. For example, Admiral Yi Sun-sin called his subordinate with this

Hokdaegi(혹대기: Flag indicating unit membership

Dock(둑): Flag that is placed where the captain is located

Other auditory signals, such as chimes, or trumpets, gongs and drums, were used.

The trick is to use soldiers to calm down when they are in chaos, to pay attention to trumpets, to force jing and drum to row hard, or to command.

They used such diverse signal systems.

3. Sanhak (算學, similar matmatics)

The scientists are similar to mathematicians.

Usually, the Jungin people stare at the Gwageo, but this is called Dohundo.
Dohundo was a low-ranking official who was in charge of collecting money and grain from a barracks or barracks.
However, I had to know Sanhak in order to collect money and grain.
Sammdosugun-tongjesa(삼도수군통제사) Gyeongsang-udo navy field has 16 people, five in Gyeongsang-jwado navy field, nine in Jeolla-jwado navy field, six in Jeolla-udo navy field, and four in Chungcheong-do navy field.
Dohundo also fought in battle.
Ah, and in the Chosun Sanhakbook, it is written that measure the distance of a ship called Manghaedosul to the ship's course or the red line, probably Dohundo did.
It is also assumed to have measured the effective range of cannons that are difficult to aim in the distance.
Finally, according to the records, if the boat was late or the situation was worse than expected, the Dohundo talked with the captain about the ship's progress.

# Jungin
The middle class was higher than the commoner and lower than the aristocracy.
# Gwageo(과거)
It was the highest-level state examination to recruit ranking officials during the
Goryeo and Joseon Dynasty

Referenced

이광연,설한국.한서대학교 동양고전연구소.조선의 산학서로 보는 이순신 장군의 학익진
Lee Kwang-yeon, Seol-the Oriental Institute of Classics at Hanso UniversityGeneral Lee Soon-shin's Academic Ideas of Joseon

김병륜.국방부 군사편찬연구소.조선시대 수군 진형과 함재 무기 운용
Kim Byung-Ryun, the Institute for Military Compilation of the Ministry of National Defense.Operation of naval weapons in the Su-gun of Joseon Dynasty

제장명.해군충무공리더십센터.임진왜란 시기 수군 깃발의 형태와 용도
a naval service centerTypes and Use of the Veterans' Flag during the Japanese Invasion of Korea in 1592

정진술.육사 육군박물관.학예지 제 15집.조선수군의 전술신호체계
Jung Jin-sul and Military Academy.the 15th school yearbookTactical Signal System of the Korean Army
 
Likes: Kadi

Haakbus

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
3,578
United States
#33
Wow you have some impressive knowledge. That makes a lot of sense for the signal arrows (which Yi Sunshin mentioned in his writings), a rocket would be much easier to see at a distance than an arrow with a flag on it.
 
Likes: momodora123
Dec 2018
3
Pennsylvania, USA
#34
Very interesting thread!

I hoping to get information on how each side paid for the war. Military historians suggest the side with the better financing is most likely to prevail in a long contest ( see Paul Kennedy's book The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers.)

I'm hoping I can find tax records for the period. What did the Chinese contribute? Could the Choson government raise taxes, or given it's exile, did local commanders control regional resources like rice or salt to provide for local military forces? Lacking that, I'd like to know the cost in goods or manhours to product things like a Pankoseon warship, cannon, weaponry, or provisions needed to support a soldier. Any information would be welcome.
 

Haakbus

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
3,578
United States
#35
I'm not particularly familiar with this, but my understanding is that the Choson court was very incapable of getting taxes or providing for troops very much. They were almost unable to provide supplies to the Ming forces when they finally arrived. This was why there were so many independently-supplied and independently-funded guerrilla armies.
 

Maki

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
2,275
Republika Srpska
#36
The Ming troops eventually became a problem for the Joseon. They were stationed in Korea and basically lived off the land which further devastated Korea. This was one of the reasons Joseon decided to finally normalize relations with Japan starting in 1601.
 
Dec 2018
3
Pennsylvania, USA
#37
Given the impotence of the Choson court to support the war effort, where did the money or resources to support the the troops come from? You don't build cannon out of straw, or ships out of rice. Troops have to eat, broken weapons replaced, worn uniforms and footwear manufactured. This takes money, raw materials, and some bureaucracy to co-ordinate efforts.

I guess I would like to find answers to what goes into making things for the war effort.

-Did local commanders collect taxes, and in what form?
-How much does a soldier eat, and how much land does it take to supply one man for one year?
-How many men does it take to build a warship, and how long does it take?
-where does the metal for weapons come from.?

These aren't "sexy" details, but are fundamental to having an effective fighting force. It was the failure of the Japanese to solve such questions that accelerated their ejection from the north.
 

Haakbus

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
3,578
United States
#38
The Ming troops eventually became a problem for the Joseon. They were stationed in Korea and basically lived off the land which further devastated Korea. This was one of the reasons Joseon decided to finally normalize relations with Japan starting in 1601.
Yeah there were instances of them killing Korean civilians and sending the heads back to China for military prestige.

Given the impotence of the Choson court to support the war effort, where did the money or resources to support the the troops come from? You don't build cannon out of straw, or ships out of rice. Troops have to eat, broken weapons replaced, worn uniforms and footwear manufactured. This takes money, raw materials, and some bureaucracy to co-ordinate efforts.

I guess I would like to find answers to what goes into making things for the war effort.

-Did local commanders collect taxes, and in what form?
-How much does a soldier eat, and how much land does it take to supply one man for one year?
-How many men does it take to build a warship, and how long does it take?
-where does the metal for weapons come from.?

These aren't "sexy" details, but are fundamental to having an effective fighting force. It was the failure of the Japanese to solve such questions that accelerated their ejection from the north.
The court sometimes able to function over local officials, but not always. I think the functions would have been left up to the local officials and aristocrats, working under the central government when they could. Many of the guerrilla leaders belonged to this class of local officials and aristocrats.

Sadly I don't know much more, since there's not very much available in English on this war and my Korean is not as good as I wish.
 
Last edited:
Dec 2018
25
East
#39
220px-Two-section_staff.jpg
https://wikivisually.com/wiki/Pyeongon

Let me introduce you a story.
The story is about flail(Pyeongon, weapon) during the imjin war.

조선왕조실록 선조 26년 계사(1593) 12월 19일(무진)

하니, 성룡이 아뢰기를,
“중국 사람들이 쓰는 철회편(鐵回鞭)이 【전일 전교에서 일컬었던 것이다.】 매우 좋습니다. 이름을 명회(命會)라고 하는 고양(高陽) 사람이 자기 아버지가 왜적에게 죽자 분발하여 왜적을 죽인 것이 거의 4백여 명이나 되는데, 그는 항상 이 철회편을 좋다고 하였다 합니다. 신이 벽제(碧蹄)에 있을 적에 어떤 군사도 철회편이 좋다고 말했었습니다.”

The Annals of the Joseon Dynasty
King seonjo 26year, December 19, 1593

Yoo Seong-ryong said,
I think the flail(Pyeongon, weapon) Chinese use will be good for soldiers.
There was a Goyang-gun(city) named Myeonghoe.
When his father was killed by the Japanese army, he went on a rampage and killed nearly 400 Japanese soldiers.
He always says that flail(Pyeongon, weapon) is good.
When I was on the Byeokje, Unnamed soldier has told me that a flail(Pyeongon, weapon) is good.
 

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