Imperial Germany allows mass immigration of skilled workers

Dec 2017
262
Regnum Teutonicum
#22
The biggest hurdle I see is that Germany would have to stop being an emigration country. The Huguenots from France which migrated to Hesse and Prussia could be used as an example. A big chunk of them were specialists. Especially Berlin gained massive economically from them. Or the sephardic jews which went to Hamburg after the Alhambra Decree in Spain.
So the German Empire could gain big amounts of skilled workers, when minorities were prosecuted in other countries (Russia pops to mind), if certain policies existed.

Maybe this is interesting for you:
When one can believe what is written in about this source (G. Stegemann: Interessantes aus der deutschen und internationalen Statistik, zusammengestellt nach dem neuesten amtlichen Material. In: Herrmann A. L. Degener: Wer ist's? III. Ausgabe, Leipzig 1908, S. XXV. ) in the internet, then in the year 1905 more then 1 million foreigners were living in Germany, 42 % of them female. Half of them were from the austrian part of Austria-Hungary (so including Czechs, Slovenians, Ukrainians, Poles, etc.), 107.007 were from Russia (so including Poles, Finns, etc.), 100.000 dutch, 100.000 italians, 82,000 from the hungarian part of Austria-Hungary, 63,000 swiss, 30,000 danes, 20,000 british (including Irish, etc.), 20,000 french, 20,000 americans (including people from latin America), 14,000 luxembourgers, 12,000 belgians, 12,000 from the Scandinavian countries, 397 chinese, 174 japanese, 100 other asians (including people from the Ottoman Empire), and 99 africans.
 
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Dec 2018
51
Australia
#23
The biggest hurdle I see is that Germany would have to stop being an emigration country. The Huguenots from France which migrated to Hesse and Prussia could be used as an example. A big chunk of them were specialists. Especially Berlin gained massive economically from them. Or the sephardic jews which went to Hamburg after the Alhambra Decree in Spain.
So the German Empire could gain big amounts of skilled workers, when minorities were prosecuted in other countries (Russia pops to mind), if certain policies existed.
Yes. This is another possibility.
 

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,544
US
#24
I agree with Pugsville. During the time of Imperial Germany there weren't many "skilled" laborers to be found around the globe. What industries would have been considered "skilled" from 1870-1914? Glass? Iron,steel? Some craftsmen? These kind of skills were often taught the apprenticeship, a lengthy process which limited the numbers. What technology there was actually increased the need for unskilled labor, the kind that mass emigrated from the eastern Marches of Imperial Germany at the encouragement of the Imperial government, which for a time, paid the the cost of travel out of the Empire.
Take the steel industry. By the average level of skill declined precipitously after 1880 due to the Bessemer process:
History of the steel industry (1850–1970) - Wikipedia
From the article linked above, "In the 1880s, the transition from wrought iron puddling to mass-produced Bessemer steel greatly increased worker productivity. Highly skilled workers remained essential, but the average level of skill declined."
 
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