In Ur Skyz, Watchin Ur Livez

unclefred

Ad Honorem
Dec 2010
6,731
Oregon coastal mountains
#21
Any technology that has the potential to be abused, will. Illegal surveillance will have a new chapter when spy drones become insect sized very shortly. Government and Industrial/corporate spying is already rampant, with this tech anyone can get a piece of the action.
 

Recusant

Ad Honorem
Sep 2009
2,624
Sector N after curfew
#22
Well, I thought the little amateur spy drone on the end of the last page was kind of nifty, but that's just the techno-geek in me getting the upper hand. :eek:

Speaking of government spying (on its own citizens using drones), I just realized I've been lax in keeping this chronicle up to date. Here's something from autumn of last year:

"Drones: 13 Things You Need To Know From Congress's New Report" | Digital Trends

The FAA estimates (pdf) that within the next 15 years, more than 20,000 drones will take to the skies in the U.S., including drones operated by police, military, public health and safety agencies, corporations, and the public in general. That number is expected to jump to 30,000 within 20 years from today — a number the FAA refers to as “relatively small.” Currently, the FAA has only given out about 300 licenses to fly drones capable of cruising at more than 400 feet in the air.
 

Pedro

Forum Staff
Mar 2008
17,151
On a mountain top in Costa Rica. yeah...I win!!
#23
Cruising at 400 feet? Dang! Would that be safe for the flying balloon guy in the lawn chair?
 

Recusant

Ad Honorem
Sep 2009
2,624
Sector N after curfew
#24
Cruising at 400 feet? Dang! Would that be safe for the flying balloon guy in the lawn chair?
Undoubtedly not, but the new regulations mean that probably most surveillance drones over the US will now be well above that height.

The ARGUS-IS technology "can resolve details as small as six inches from an altitude of 17,500 feet." The article I just linked to has a clip from the recent PBS Nova television show about drones called "The Rise of the Drones", which can be viewed online right now, at least in the US (not sure about elsewhere).
 
Mar 2010
1,326
Ohio
#25
Well, I thought the little amateur spy drone on the end of the last page was kind of nifty, but that's just the techno-geek in me getting the upper hand. :eek:

Speaking of government spying (on its own citizens using drones), I just realized I've been lax in keeping this chronicle up to date. Here's something from autumn of last year:

"Drones: 13 Things You Need To Know From Congress's New Report" | Digital Trends
After reading this article, I think the time has come for me to seriously consider leaving the United States.
 
Jul 2008
5,397
Sharkland
#27

Recusant

Ad Honorem
Sep 2009
2,624
Sector N after curfew
#28
A U. S. Senate panel has been holding a hearing about the future of drone surveillance in the United States:

Associated Press, via PhysOrg:

Privacy laws urgently need to be updated to protect the public from information-gathering by the thousands of civilian drones expected to be flying in U.S. skies in the next decade or so, legal experts told a Senate panel Wednesday.

A budding commercial drone industry is poised to put mostly small, unmanned aircraft to countless uses, from monitoring crops to acting as lookouts for police, but federal and state privacy laws have been outpaced by advances in drone technology, experts said at a Senate hearing.


Continues . . .
 

unclefred

Ad Honorem
Dec 2010
6,731
Oregon coastal mountains
#29
A U. S. Senate panel has been holding a hearing about the future of drone surveillance in the United States:
I'm not counting on the Senate to come down on the side of citizens privacy. Just as other futurist devices become the now, such as google glasses and tiny surveillance drones, the resistance will be a vocal, tiny bump in the road.
 

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