In Ur Skyz, Watchin Ur Livez

Mar 2010
1,327
Ohio
I'm not sure where you could go in a first world country to get away from the future.
It's not so much "getting away from the future", it's how the future is being implemented. Save for the UK, which first world nation has taken technology to such draconian lengths as we have?
 
Mar 2010
1,327
Ohio
How about sunny Florida in the US of A?

Surveillance drone ban: Drones ban advances despite law-enforcement protests - Orlando Sentinel

Well, not yet, but maybe soon.

But I'm sure that there will be other nations which ban drone use too. Or at least a better criminal justice system with less prisoners and less reasons to go to prison than the US does. :D
Seems sunny Florida may be joined by not so sunny Minnesota.

Bipartisan anti-drone bill introduced in the Minnesota House | StarTribune.com
 

Recusant

Ad Honorem
Sep 2009
2,624
Sector N after curfew
After adoption of new regulations covering the operation of drones in Japan, Tokyo police are setting up a "drone squad" to deal with illegal use of drones.

"Drone squad to be launched by Tokyo police" | BBC

The police unit will patrol important buildings such as the prime minister's office.

If a suspicious drone is detected, the operator will be warned via loudspeakers on the ground.

But if he or she fails to respond, police will launch drones equipped with nets to bring down the device.
A video of the net drone in operation:

[ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-vknRo7aLhc[/ame]
 

Recusant

Ad Honorem
Sep 2009
2,624
Sector N after curfew
Drones being used for surveillance and harassment of law enforcement.

"A Criminal Gang Used a Drone Swarm To Obstruct an FBI Hostage Raid" | Defense One

Last winter, on the outskirts of a large U.S. city, an FBI hostage rescue team set up an elevated observation post to assess an unfolding situation. Soon they heard the buzz of small drones — and then the tiny aircraft were all around them, swooping past in a series of “high-speed low passes at the agents in the observation post to flush them,” the head of the agency’s operational technology law unit told attendees of the AUVSI Xponential conference here. Result: “We were then blind,” said Joe Mazel, meaning the group lost situational awareness of the target. “It definitely presented some challenges.”

[. . .]

Mazel said counter surveillance of law enforcement agents is the fastest-growing way that organized criminals are using drones.

Some criminal organizations have begun to use drones as part of witness intimidation schemes: they continuously surveil police departments and precincts in order to see “who is going in and out of the facility and who might be co-operating with police,” he said.

Drones are also playing a greater role in robberies and the like. Beyond the well-documented incidence of house break-ins, criminal crews are using them to observe bigger target facilities, spot security gaps, and determine patterns of life: where the security guards go and when.

[Continues . . .]