Increasing Islamophobia in the west

Nov 2010
1,279
Bordeaux
it seems that european citizens are themselves are in denial of their neo nazi/far right/fascist uprisings

Media captionWhat is the Pegida movement?
Pegida supporters say people need to "wake up" to the threat of Islamist extremists. They want Germany to curb immigration and accuse the authorities of failing to enforce existing laws.
What you posted does not prove European citizens are in any sort denial.

Is the Far right on the rise in Europe (and elsewhere, for that matter)? Yes, we can all see that.
Has it reached tsunami-level? Not quite.

Are islamist extremists a threat? Yes, no doubt about that, as any other sort of extremists. It just happens that, in recent decades, Islamist extremists have been the most active compared to others types of extremists.
Is every muslim person a dangerous extremist? Not quite, and the vast majority of European citizens know that. Which does not prevent Far right extremists from existing.
 
Mar 2019
1,665
KL

In Austria, the government has proposed and implemented a series of anti-migrant and refugee policies even as the number of migrants crossing the country's border has plummetted over the last few years. The Freedom Party is calling for a ban on immigrants from Muslim countries.

Baumann, the 19-year-old university student, argued that Muslim immigrants' deeply-held religious beliefs are in tension with Austria's more secular culture and politics. He compared Austria's Muslim communities to ultra-orthodox Jews in Israel and evangelical Christians in the US and suggested these groups undermine the separation of church and state.

"The Middle European values we have and we built in the last few hundred years and the values the people from the Middle Eastern regions bring are not very compatible," said Baumann, who attended the Kickl event in Traisen with his father, also an FPÖ voter. "I'm a big fan of the Muslim culture, as well as my father, we go to Muslim countries like Morocco and we love it there — it's amazing. But it's not very compatible."


Like many on the far-right, Baumann cites higher birth rates among Austria's Muslim immigrant communities than among among its native-born population, which he argued will be a "huge problem" in the future.

This explicitly anti-Muslim sentiment is embedded in the Freedom Party's DNA. The party's long-time former leader and Nazi sympathizer, Jörg Haider, wrote in his 1993 book that "the societal foundations of Islam are diametrically opposed to our Western values." Kurz is pushing to prohibit young Muslim girls from wearing headscarves in school. He does, however, support keeping Christian crosses in classrooms.

In an indication of how the far-right's anti-immigrant stances have moved the conversation in Europe, the European Commission in September re-named the position responsible for migration policy to "vice president for protecting our European way of life." The re-naming sparked widespread outrage, but the EU's new president hasn't backed down.
 

AlpinLuke

Forum Staff
Oct 2011
27,181
Italy, Lago Maggiore

In Austria, the government has proposed and implemented a series of anti-migrant and refugee policies even as the number of migrants crossing the country's border has plummetted over the last few years. The Freedom Party is calling for a ban on immigrants from Muslim countries.

Baumann, the 19-year-old university student, argued that Muslim immigrants' deeply-held religious beliefs are in tension with Austria's more secular culture and politics. He compared Austria's Muslim communities to ultra-orthodox Jews in Israel and evangelical Christians in the US and suggested these groups undermine the separation of church and state.

"The Middle European values we have and we built in the last few hundred years and the values the people from the Middle Eastern regions bring are not very compatible," said Baumann, who attended the Kickl event in Traisen with his father, also an FPÖ voter. "I'm a big fan of the Muslim culture, as well as my father, we go to Muslim countries like Morocco and we love it there — it's amazing. But it's not very compatible."


Like many on the far-right, Baumann cites higher birth rates among Austria's Muslim immigrant communities than among among its native-born population, which he argued will be a "huge problem" in the future.

This explicitly anti-Muslim sentiment is embedded in the Freedom Party's DNA. The party's long-time former leader and Nazi sympathizer, Jörg Haider, wrote in his 1993 book that "the societal foundations of Islam are diametrically opposed to our Western values." Kurz is pushing to prohibit young Muslim girls from wearing headscarves in school. He does, however, support keeping Christian crosses in classrooms.

In an indication of how the far-right's anti-immigrant stances have moved the conversation in Europe, the European Commission in September re-named the position responsible for migration policy to "vice president for protecting our European way of life." The re-naming sparked widespread outrage, but the EU's new president hasn't backed down.
To be fair, we should underline that the Austrian government wanted to close also the border with Italy, stopping also Italians ...
 

AlpinLuke

Forum Staff
Oct 2011
27,181
Italy, Lago Maggiore
Again ... it's xenophobia, not "Islamophobia". There are some countries in the European Unions [overall in the Eastern region] which are closing their borders to all [Italians included!], regardless religion, absolutely. They don't want other foreigners. Period.

To keep on underlining "Islamophobia" could make me think to an agenda [and to close this thread].
 
Mar 2019
1,665
KL
ooks like an Islam victim narrative thread. You might just ask why in England (to talk about my own country) we don't have any perceived problem with Sikhophobia, Hinduphobia etc.?
the target of far right neo nazi fascist in europe is not sikh or a hindu

The government said late Wednesday that the patka head covering worn by Sikh boys or the Jewish yarmulke would not be affected because the law refers to head garments that "cover all of the hair or large parts of it." Exceptions are made for head coverings for medical reasons or protection against rain or snow.
 

At Each Kilometer

Ad Honorem
Sep 2012
4,002
Bulgaria
I think you are right @AlpinLuke it is a form of xenophobia / reaction towards the xenoi. Locals at least in my case i am certain have nothing against their neighbours, who live on this land for hundreds of years, their culture, native language or faith.
 
Oct 2011
467
Croatia
Considering what happens in multicultural countries whenever some sort of disturbance hits them, xenophillia and multiculturalism are just as illogical as xenophobia and right-wing extremism. Live and let live, but for that you need borders.