India is a Space power now !

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holoow

Ad Honorem
Jun 2012
3,689
Vilnius, Lithuania
#51
The story is dated in 2014 certainly not 'recently ' as you have written. Let us get this straight. India has been a Hindu nation since a very long time. In fact Buddhism itself is more than 2500 years old and Hinduism dates back at least 500 years before that e.g. Alexander encountering a Hindu Sannyasi during his invasion of India etc. Islam first entered India when Mohammed Bin Kasim attacked the Hindu King Dahir in the present day Sind province of Pakistan, this being about 700 A.D. Thereafter the Islamic invaders of various regions west of the then India continued to invade India converting Hindus by force, raping Hindu women, and looting the country. Most of the people of present day Pakistan were formerly Hindu s. Reconversion of those willing to come back to Hinduism has been going on since the British days. So what is wrong with that ?
Is Jainism even older than Hinduism? How Jain community is viewed in India?
 
Apr 2018
1,562
Mythical land.
#52
Is Jainism even older than Hinduism? How Jain community is viewed in India?
hinduism and jainism don't really have a start date,we don't know when either one started,both of them however did grew side by side.

I think both hinduism and jainism are continuation of animist,pagan,polytheist religions that originated in india,gradually developing philosophical standings to justify those beliefs.


jain community is viewed as kind of extreme pacifists by mainstream indians(in the weird way),and most jains do well in society and are viewed respectfully if not talking about their dietery preference which they seem to think they have a right to "guilt impose",kind of like vegans if you ask me.
 

kandal

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,568
USA
#53
NASA blames India for creating space debris that threatens the International Space Station with its anti-satellite test

NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine said today (April 1) that India's recent anti-satellite test created 60 pieces of orbital debris big enough to track, 24 of which rise higher than the International Space Station's orbit around Earth. Bridenstine had harsh words to say about India's test today in a NASA town hall meeting, saying that causing this type of risk to humans in space, and low Earth orbit operations, was unacceptable.

"That is a terrible, terrible thing, to create an event that sends debris in an apogee that goes above the International Space Station," Bridenstine said at the town hall meeting, which was livestreamed on NASA TV. "And that kind of activity is not compatible with the future of human spaceflight that we need to see happen."
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Bridenstine said that NASA has identified 400 pieces of orbital debris from the event, including the 60 greater than 10 centimeters in diameter that the agency can track and 24 that travel through the space station's orbital height. As of last week, the agency, along with the Combined Space Operations Center (part of U.S. Strategic Command), had estimated that the risk to the International Space Station of small-debris impact had risen by 44 percent over a period of 10 days.

India's Anti-Satellite Test Created Dangerous Debris, NASA Chief Says
 
Likes: sailorsam
Jul 2016
8,393
USA
#54
NASA blames India for creating space debris that threatens the International Space Station with its anti-satellite test

NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine said today (April 1) that India's recent anti-satellite test created 60 pieces of orbital debris big enough to track, 24 of which rise higher than the International Space Station's orbit around Earth. Bridenstine had harsh words to say about India's test today in a NASA town hall meeting, saying that causing this type of risk to humans in space, and low Earth orbit operations, was unacceptable.

"That is a terrible, terrible thing, to create an event that sends debris in an apogee that goes above the International Space Station," Bridenstine said at the town hall meeting, which was livestreamed on NASA TV. "And that kind of activity is not compatible with the future of human spaceflight that we need to see happen."
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Bridenstine said that NASA has identified 400 pieces of orbital debris from the event, including the 60 greater than 10 centimeters in diameter that the agency can track and 24 that travel through the space station's orbital height. As of last week, the agency, along with the Combined Space Operations Center (part of U.S. Strategic Command), had estimated that the risk to the International Space Station of small-debris impact had risen by 44 percent over a period of 10 days.

India's Anti-Satellite Test Created Dangerous Debris, NASA Chief Says
Whoops!
 

Cepheus

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
2,012
#55
"The good thing is, it's low enough in Earth orbit that over time this will all dissipate," Bridenstine said — whereas much of the debris from a 2007 Chinese anti-satellite test is still in orbit.
Interesting.

More than 500,000 pieces of debris, or “space junk,” are tracked as they orbit the Earth
Space Debris and Human Spacecraft

Hmmm...

The Shakti (which means “power” in Hindi) mission lasted three minutes, and the target was blown up in its orbit 186 miles from Earth, he said, describing it as a “proud moment” for India
https://www.washingtonpost.com/worl...fb9615010d7_story.html?utm_term=.47970df8ddcc

240: The average distance in miles above Earth's surface the ISS orbits (400 kilometers). On a clear day, the ISS is easily visible to the naked eye from the ground. Observers on the ground can see the station pass by overhead by tracking it using tools provided by NASA.
International Space Station: By the Numbers
 
Feb 2019
88
Mumbai
#56
That should be no surprise. India has almost no impact on the world outside its immediate surroundings. Despite having the sixth largest economy in the world, millions and millions of people live in poverty. How much money was spent on this while many people still don't have adequate sanitation?

India has 95% of the population of China and 20% the GDP. It ranks around 140th in terms of nominal GDP per capita, below the likes of communist Laos, Papua New Guinea and Bhutan.

So yes, it's hard to take things like this seriously. How exactly does the ability to shoot down satellites make people's lives any better?
A rather naive post coming from a person of your caliber. Development mostly happens parallely, and for large nations, military tech often forms the bedrock of early R&D ecosystem. So many technologies that have transformed our lives came from prototypes meant for military purposes. Large nations often become military powers before being economically developed and there is a very good reason for that.
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
31,988
T'Republic of Yorkshire
#57
A rather naive post coming from a person of your caliber. Development mostly happens parallely, and for large nations, military tech often forms the bedrock of early R&D ecosystem. So many technologies that have transformed our lives came from prototypes meant for military purposes. Large nations often become military powers before being economically developed and there is a very good reason for that.
Not at all - look at China. It developed its economy first, before developing its technology.
 
Oct 2016
1,040
Merryland
#58
Not at all - look at China. It developed its economy first, before developing its technology.
unfortunate imitation (or simulation, not sure who did first) of North Korea
can't feed its people but we got nukes / space program!
well its their country so however they want to prioritize
 

rvsakhadeo

Ad Honorem
Sep 2012
8,899
India
#59
Let's get this clear
unfortunate imitation (or simulation, not sure who did first) of North Korea
can't feed its people but we got nukes / space program!
well its their country so however they want to prioritize
Let's get this clear. i) India is self sufficient in foodgrains and has a buffer stock. It exports a superior variety of rice though not in large quantity. ii ) India is well on the way of having a strategic reserve of oil. iii ) It is well on the way of limiting the increase in its population. iv ) There's an immense increase in literacy, esp.among women in villages. v) The life expectancy is also on the rise. There is a great decline in infant deaths. vi ) The facilities for education whether at primary, secondary or college levels have been augmented. vii) The favourite among western commentators--- whether enough toilets are available. Yes, an immense programme of construction of toilets esp.in villages is under implementation.
So ,if we develope our technology for defensive purposes, westerners --at least those much concerned with defecation--should not mind. Many persons from the UK ought to be concerned how the Thames in London looks more like a river of sewage .
 
Last edited:
Mar 2016
711
Antalya
#60
While doing so, you have created a ton of debris orbiting around the world and endangering astronauts on mission.


You don't take us Indians, our political system, our good democratic set up of the government seriously, do you? The govt.in power today is a sensible govt. It is run by professionally competent and mature technocrats and administrators headed by lawmakers of a high caliber. It can be understood that Pakistan and the PRC are jealous of our hard earned successes in spite of severe problems but the Western people being sarcastic was not expected. Your prejudices could be allowed to recede into the background for a day---at least.
No one is jealous of you, your culture and your poverty-ridden country.
 
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