Indigenous Peoples' Day: The Significance of the Holdiay Compared to Columbus Day

Dec 2019
1
United States
Indigenous Peoples' Day in the United States is a holiday that honors Native Americans and their culture. Interestingly, this holiday is not widely accepted by many areas in the United States. Recently, many states such as Michigan and Vermont have outright sought to replace Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples' Day. With the introduction of Indigenous Peoples' Day in many new locations in place of Columbus Day, should people be concerned?

On one hand, you have a holiday that deserves federal recognition that highlights Native Americans and their culture. On the other hand, Columbus Day is a holiday that the United States has recognized for a long time; which signifies Columbus' landing in the Americas. Looking at Indigenous Peoples' Day, there is no reason why it should not be a federal holiday. Our nation's past with the Native Americans is not redeemable, but surely the implementation of this holiday is a step in the right direction for celebrating Native Americans that have, and still live in the United States.

Columbus Day, while celebrating Christopher Columbus' landing in the Americas and the introduction of Western culture to the Americas, is not necessarily a bad thing to celebrate, but if anything, Indigenous Peoples' Day directly celebrates Natives Americans, who are indigenous Americans; whereas Columbus Day celebrates European aspects, albeit relevant to our country at the same time. I also surmise that the average person believes that Columbus was the first to discover the Americas, but that is incorrect. If for some reason that was the case, then Columbus Day would make more sense as a holiday, but it is not.

To me, Columbus' landing in the Americas was significant only because he introduced the West to the "New World". Other than that, there is not really any other significance that we should celebrate. With that being said, I do not know why Columbus Day is a federal holiday and Indigenous Peoples' Day is not. If anything, Columbus Day serves as a celebration of the atrocities that the Western colonizers provided to the Native Americans both directly and indirectly. Of course, Columbus Day is not meant to celebrate the atrocities toward the Native Americans, but to celebrate Columbus' arrival in the Americas. Unfortunately, the underlying meaning of Columbus Day is perplexing, to say the least.

Another interesting point is about the celebrations of the holidays. For Indigenous Peoples' Day, there are plenty of things that you can actively celebrate: culture, activities, history, and more. Columbus Day, on the other hand, is hollow in its celebration, in my opinion. For a holiday that has a slight significance to our nation, there really isn't much to celebrate. That is because it has no impact on Americans. Other holidays like Labor Day, Memorial Day, and Veterans Day all have significant meanings to us as a whole.

With all of this in mind, the question that lingers in my mind is why Indigenous Peoples' Day is not a federal holiday. While I can see some significance in Columbus Day, shouldn't our government opt for a federal celebration of the indigenous Native Americans instead?

These are some of my thoughts regarding the topic. I would love to hear more opinions below!
 

Chlodio

Forum Staff
Aug 2016
4,785
Dispargum
Welcome to Historum.
There is an opinion out there that there are already too many federal holidays. Some federal holidays are routinely ignored. In recent years the stock market has opened on some of the lesser holidays. The company that picks up my trash every week only recognizes six holidays each year. When the trash guys take a holiday, everyone's trash gets picked up one day late that week. It's not really a holiday for the trash guys if they have to work the following Saturday.

Columbus Day is one of the lesser holidays that is often ignored. It is far more likely that Columbus Day will lose its federal recognition than that a new holiday will be added. Columbus Day is an important holiday in the Italian-American community celebrated with parades and other festivities. Years ago when Italian-Americans were recent immigrants and to some extent a minority, it was one argument in favor of Columbus Day that the majority recognize the minority one day a year. Now that Italian-Americans have merged into the American mainstream, that's one less argument in defense of Columbus Day. St. Patrick's Day is a big day for the Irish-American community, but it never had federal recognition. Maybe Columbus Day should be like St. Patrick's Day - on the calendar but not federally recognized.

I happen to agree there are too many holidays. We should only add a new one if we first get rid of at least one of the existing holidays.
 
Jul 2019
853
New Jersey
Welcome to Historum.
There is an opinion out there that there are already too many federal holidays. Some federal holidays are routinely ignored. In recent years the stock market has opened on some of the lesser holidays. The company that picks up my trash every week only recognizes six holidays each year. When the trash guys take a holiday, everyone's trash gets picked up one day late that week. It's not really a holiday for the trash guys if they have to work the following Saturday.

Columbus Day is one of the lesser holidays that is often ignored. It is far more likely that Columbus Day will lose its federal recognition than that a new holiday will be added. Columbus Day is an important holiday in the Italian-American community celebrated with parades and other festivities. Years ago when Italian-Americans were recent immigrants and to some extent a minority, it was one argument in favor of Columbus Day that the majority recognize the minority one day a year. Now that Italian-Americans have merged into the American mainstream, that's one less argument in defense of Columbus Day. St. Patrick's Day is a big day for the Irish-American community, but it never had federal recognition. Maybe Columbus Day should be like St. Patrick's Day - on the calendar but not federally recognized.

I happen to agree there are too many holidays. We should only add a new one if we first get rid of at least one of the existing holidays.
Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Years, Independence Day, Veterans Day, and Memorial Day.

Cap it there. Maybe throw in Labor Day too.
 
Mar 2016
168
US
Indigenous Peoples' Day in the United States is a holiday that honors Native Americans and their culture. Interestingly, this holiday is not widely accepted by many areas in the United States. Recently, many states such as Michigan and Vermont have outright sought to replace Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples' Day. With the introduction of Indigenous Peoples' Day in many new locations in place of Columbus Day, should people be concerned?

On one hand, you have a holiday that deserves federal recognition that highlights Native Americans and their culture. On the other hand, Columbus Day is a holiday that the United States has recognized for a long time; which signifies Columbus' landing in the Americas. Looking at Indigenous Peoples' Day, there is no reason why it should not be a federal holiday. Our nation's past with the Native Americans is not redeemable, but surely the implementation of this holiday is a step in the right direction for celebrating Native Americans that have, and still live in the United States.

Columbus Day, while celebrating Christopher Columbus' landing in the Americas and the introduction of Western culture to the Americas, is not necessarily a bad thing to celebrate, but if anything, Indigenous Peoples' Day directly celebrates Natives Americans, who are indigenous Americans; whereas Columbus Day celebrates European aspects, albeit relevant to our country at the same time. I also surmise that the average person believes that Columbus was the first to discover the Americas, but that is incorrect. If for some reason that was the case, then Columbus Day would make more sense as a holiday, but it is not.

To me, Columbus' landing in the Americas was significant only because he introduced the West to the "New World". Other than that, there is not really any other significance that we should celebrate. With that being said, I do not know why Columbus Day is a federal holiday and Indigenous Peoples' Day is not. If anything, Columbus Day serves as a celebration of the atrocities that the Western colonizers provided to the Native Americans both directly and indirectly. Of course, Columbus Day is not meant to celebrate the atrocities toward the Native Americans, but to celebrate Columbus' arrival in the Americas. Unfortunately, the underlying meaning of Columbus Day is perplexing, to say the least.

Another interesting point is about the celebrations of the holidays. For Indigenous Peoples' Day, there are plenty of things that you can actively celebrate: culture, activities, history, and more. Columbus Day, on the other hand, is hollow in its celebration, in my opinion. For a holiday that has a slight significance to our nation, there really isn't much to celebrate. That is because it has no impact on Americans. Other holidays like Labor Day, Memorial Day, and Veterans Day all have significant meanings to us as a whole.

With all of this in mind, the question that lingers in my mind is why Indigenous Peoples' Day is not a federal holiday. While I can see some significance in Columbus Day, shouldn't our government opt for a federal celebration of the indigenous Native Americans instead?

These are some of my thoughts regarding the topic. I would love to hear more opinions below!
While celebrating indengenous people day is a big sty forward..... We still have a long way to go. We must confess the inaccurate history lessons told to our children in school. Why? For many reasons. #1 So we don't repeat the mistakes of the past. #2So that those erased from the history of America's is told.
I think telling telling history that has been omitted will give confidence to the descendants of this history. Most important , we can't get past things that are never acknowledged.

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