Industrial Revolution in USA, social questions and comparison wie Europe

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
3,403
Sydney
#41
I got a hunch that early capitalism in the US was quite ruthless in it's employment of recent immigrants
recent migrants were even more removed from any fellowship feeling and were largely despised
this apply to today's immigrants under a thin varnish of humanitarian discourse ,
their main function is as expendable wage slaves for the educated middle class

farm laborers were a necessity of agriculture until mechanization around the turn of the century threw them into the city
urban life is in fact a population sink , the poors died quite a lot and need a constant replenishment from the surrounding rural areas
the recent arrival are used for the worst job , artisans and such "good" jobs operated a close shop system often within the family or relations


P.S. "there were large tracts of lands held by holder of Dutch aristocratic titles and tenant farmers "

the American word Boss is supposed to come from the Duch Baes ... chief ....master ...foreman
 

royal744

Ad Honorem
Jul 2013
9,804
San Antonio, Tx
#42
Another thing was that socialism, anarchism, communism, and so on came out of the French Revolution to a large degree. That Revolution did not have as much influence in the US. We still don't use the metric system for example. There is less of the medieval class system and such, at least outside of the south, but a lot of newer approaches didn't make it here. For example, votes in Congress are usually not on party lines.
In fact, only the ‘civilian economy” uses the English system of measures in the US. All academic and scientific research and engineering mostly uses the metric system and, of course, the military has been on the metric system for a very long time. The anachronism is the civilian economy and its continued use of the English system of measures.
 

royal744

Ad Honorem
Jul 2013
9,804
San Antonio, Tx
#43
I got a hunch that early capitalism in the US was quite ruthless in it's employment of recent immigrants
recent migrants were even more removed from any fellowship feeling and were largely despised
this apply to today's immigrants under a thin varnish of humanitarian discourse ,
their main function is as expendable wage slaves for the educated middle class

farm laborers were a necessity of agriculture until mechanization around the turn of the century threw them into the city
urban life is in fact a population sink , the poors died quite a lot and need a constant replenishment from the surrounding rural areas
the recent arrival are used for the worst job , artisans and such "good" jobs operated a close shop system often within the family or relations


P.S. "there were large tracts of lands held by holder of Dutch aristocratic titles and tenant farmers "

the American word Boss is supposed to come from the Duch Baes ... chief ....master ...foreman
What does this post even mean? What do the Dutch have to do with the other 99% of land in the country besides NOTHING at all? Oh, and “Dutch aristocratic titles” - LOL -how influential and long-lasting were those? How about ZERO influence? I can just picture a Dutch settler/farmer saying, “I’m a duke in Holland” to the sound of screaming laughter.
 

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
3,403
Sydney
#44
Dutch influence in the state of New York was wide and deep ,
some of the issue on land tenure did not got solved until the late XIX century
 

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
5,689
#45
What does this post even mean? What do the Dutch have to do with the other 99% of land in the country besides NOTHING at all? Oh, and “Dutch aristocratic titles” - LOL -how influential and long-lasting were those? How about ZERO influence? I can just picture a Dutch settler/farmer saying, “I’m a duke in Holland” to the sound of screaming laughter.
Stephen Van Rennselear III, 6th Patroon of Rennselearwick, held one million acres with tenant farmer and was one of the five richest men in world. He was also the unqualified and incompetent commander of an invasion of Canada. I don't think anyone would have laughed at his Dutch title.

I agree that this didn't effect land outside New York state. Most of the good land in the south was in plantations. However, I agree that land was much less concentrated in the hands of an elite of aristocracy than in Europe or Latin America.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
13,840
SoCal
#46
I am interested in the question about the industrial revolution in the USA, especially from the social point of view and differences in the development in comparison to Europe, especially with GB, F and and Germany.

Would you agree that there were stronger union and workers movements in Europe than in the US? That there was more sympathy for Marxist ideas?

If you have good links I would apreciate.
In 1906, Werner Sombart (a German economist and sociologist) wrote a book called Why is there no Socialism in the United States?.

See if you can get a copy of this book for free. It might be interesting to read based on what I've heard about it.
 

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