Internal migration in a surviving Austria-Hungary

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
16,699
SoCal
#1
I was wondering what internal migration would have looked like in a surviving Austria-Hungary (for instance, due to World War I never occurring). I'm presuming that the more developed areas of A-H (German Austria, the Sudetenland, Czechia, and parts of Hungary) would have received a lot of migrants from other, less developed parts of Austria-Hungary but I was also wondering if the southern part of Austria-Hungary (Slovenia, Croatia, and Bosnia) could have eventually experienced a lot of growth and become an attractive destination from migrants from other parts of A-H as a result of their warm climate. Basically, I want to know if these areas could have eventually become A-H's Sun Belt.

Any thoughts on all of this?

Also, for reference:

 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
16,699
SoCal
#2
I suppose that a good question to ask in regards to this would be this--which parts of Austria-Hungary were capable of sustaining a much larger population in 1914?
 
Oct 2013
13,798
Europix
#3
First nitpick (just to keep You in shape!): why You use the word "migrants"?

I don't think You would call a family moving from Minnesota to California, or from Nettanya to Tel Aviv for a better job opportunity a "migrant", would You?
 
Oct 2013
13,798
Europix
#4
I suppose that a good question to ask in regards to this would be this--which parts of Austria-Hungary were capable of sustaining a much larger population in 1914?
Practically all plain/hill regions. Generally speaking, the region has good lands, able to provide an efficient agriculture/horticulture.

It's simpler to look at the parts unable to sustain a significantly larger population: Alps (Slovenia and a part of Austria plus a part of Croatia) and Carpathians ( parts of Bohemia, Galicia, Transilvania)
 
Likes: Futurist
Apr 2017
1,080
U.S.A.
#5
Slovenia, Croatia and Bosnia are rather mountainous (as is Austria), so they probably aren't that much warmer than say Hungary or Czechia. I would say the only areas fitting this description would be the coastal regions (Istria, Dalmatia).
Worth noting is many people may choose to leave the country and immigrate overseas, to the US and other Amercan countries (like what happened in real life post ww1).
That said, the trend of people moving to more developed major cities in Austria (Vienna especially) would probably continue. I'd say it wouldn't be so much moving from one region to another so much as undeveloped to developed. Something similar was happening in Germany pre-ww1, many east germans moved west to the more developed regions (ex. Prussian farmers moving to the Ruhr).
 
Likes: Futurist
Dec 2011
4,538
Iowa USA
#6
First nitpick (just to keep You in shape!): why You use the word "migrants"?

I don't think You would call a family moving from Minnesota to California, or from Nettanya to Tel Aviv for a better job opportunity a "migrant", would You?
I have jokingly referred to my own history of economic migration within the States using a more pejorative term than "migrant". So I think F's use of language is fine.

(my 0.02 ;))
 
Oct 2013
13,798
Europix
#7
A surviving A-H, with no WWI would rather imply that the huge internal (mainly) ethnic tensions were appeased to a tolerable level.

One of the possible models would be something close to the Swiss model. That implies a good level of local autonomy, with a central power keeping only the "regalian" ministries and the role of "balance".

I'm presuming that the more developed areas of A-H (German Austria, the Sudetenland, Czechia, and parts of Hungary
Based on the premise I mentioned, plus the specificities of the regions, I think we could exclude (at least in part) the distinctions "more developed Sudetenland, Czechia, and parts of Hungary".

To begin with, we can reasonably think that regions that now are developing at a quit quick pace would have had then too, as it is a question geographic emplacement, resources, accessibility, aso. Croatian Sea side => shipyards, maritime transportation, South Transilvania => heavy industry, has production, North Transilvania/North Hungary/Galicia => wood industry, and the examples can continue.

People moving would be from rural zones to urban/industrial zones, and developing urban/industrial zones existed in all regions already before WWI.

It wouldn't have changed radically the ethnic composition of the regions/countries.

What would have changed is the urban/industrial zones, that would have become much more "multi-ethnical".

But I don't see Bratislava becoming Romanian or Ljubliana Hungarian because of a large influx.
 
Likes: Futurist
Oct 2013
13,798
Europix
#8
I have jokingly referred to my own history of economic migration within the States using a more pejorative term than "migrant". So I think F's use of language is fine.

(my 0.02 ;))
It's just that I really have a broomstick in my ... (fill the blanks) when it comes to the use of some words in some contexts ...

It's odd (or I'm just inconsistent), but "migration" is used referring to internal movements and it doesn't bother me as the "migrant" when it's about internal movement.

(my 0,01 :eek: )
 
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Tulun

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
3,739
Western Eurasia
#9
Within Hungary this was the trend of internal migration in the decades before 1910, based on the places of birth



The balance of migration, the greener areas had an active balance (migrants went there), the redder/pinkish ones had passive balance (migrants went from there).
Green=areas of immigration, pink=counties and towns sending out population.

Second map, emigration to the USA between 1899-1913.



Generally the population would continue to move to the bigger cities, industrial zones as deaf tuner already pointed it out.
 
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
16,699
SoCal
#10
First nitpick (just to keep You in shape!): why You use the word "migrants"?

I don't think You would call a family moving from Minnesota to California, or from Nettanya to Tel Aviv for a better job opportunity a "migrant", would You?
Yes, I actually would call them migrants. Migration can be from city to city, from region to region, or from country to country.