Internal migration in a surviving Austria-Hungary

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
16,748
SoCal
#21
the Banat/Bansag is an interesting region (Temesvar=Timisoara is the main town), it has a rich (and sometimes surprising) history.

Plus I know it a bit, and I have some very good memories. But that's personal.
Did you live there?

Szeged is less important and smaller, probably because it lies between two other trade cities.
Which other trade cities?

Szabadka has a small population and is close to Belgrade, so less important.
So, too close to Belgrade?
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
16,748
SoCal
#22
Northern Croatia was the most developed part of Croatia as far as i know, that is why it was the most attractive, in southern Transylvania indeed industrialization could cause it (and mining?). In Central Hungary yes, it was the capital city that attracted the most immigrants. The first map was based on the 1910 census datas, the place of birth of the counted population compared to their place of residence. Generally apart from urbanization, industrialization and mining, big building projects, such as railway building and river regulation projects also caused temporary migrations, and there were also regular sesonal ones for agricultural works.

Around a quarter of all American emigrants were Hungarian speaking, indeed the minorities were overrepresented, but even there as it is easily visible in the case of Slovaks and Rusyns, the highest output was from peripherical areas with weak industrialization and smaller paced urbanization + poorer agricultural opportunities. So IMO the primer factor was economical in their case too (just like in the case of the emigrant Hungarians), not linguistic policies.

Btw around 35-40 percent of the American emigrants later returned, so many of them only worked in the US temporarily until they collected some wealth.
Very interesting information!

Also, in regards to central Hungary having a lot of migrants, I was talking more about the large area surrounding Budapest rather than about Budapest itself. Did Budapest already have a lot of suburbs back in 1910?
 

Tulun

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
3,739
Western Eurasia
#23
Did Budapest already have a lot of suburbs back in 1910?
Yes, in fact large parts of present day Budapest were still de jure separate towns back then, only attached to the city in 1950 (the so called Greater Budapest), the city's geographic area was also doubled with that reform.
 
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
16,748
SoCal
#24
Yes, in fact large parts of present day Budapest were still de jure separate towns back then, only attached to the city in 1950 (the so called Greater Budapest), the city's geographic area was also doubled with that reform.
So that's why central Hungary is shown as having a lot of migrants in 1910, correct?
 

Tulun

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
3,739
Western Eurasia
#25
So that's why central Hungary is shown as having a lot of migrants in 1910, correct?
I think so, i haven't browsed through settlement level increases, but IMO it could be the main reason, Kispest, Újpest, Csepel etc (now these are districts of the capital city since 1950 but in 1910 they were still separate towns) could attract many immigrants. For example back then this famous industrial complex was also outside the borders of Budapest Manfréd Weiss Steel and Metal Works - Wikipedia
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
16,748
SoCal
#26
Thanks for this information!

BTW, how much larger do you think that the Budapest metropolitan area would have been right now had there been no World Wars and Austria-Hungary would have somehow managed to survive up to the present-day?
 

Tulun

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
3,739
Western Eurasia
#27
Thanks for this information!

BTW, how much larger do you think that the Budapest metropolitan area would have been right now had there been no World Wars and Austria-Hungary would have somehow managed to survive up to the present-day?
I have no idea what would be the urban development trends in that case, probably in absolute numbers the population of the whole Central Hungarian region would be still around 3 million as it is today (within it Budapest proper having 1,7 million), maybe slightly more. But present day Hungary is water headed, 20 percent of the population living in the capital, 1/3 of the population living in the whole Cental Hungarian region, in a greater Hungary this would most likely be not that imbalanced. Though it is a fact that the country was made this Budapest centric in the Austro-Hungarian times, it was in that time when the major rail networks were layed down, with all the major lines leading to Budapest.
 
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