Intra-Chinese rivalry.

pablo668

Ad Honorem
Apr 2010
2,187
Perth, Western Australia. or....hickville.
#1
Is there still any regional rivalry in modern day China?

I have to admit to knowing next to nothing about Chinese history....beyond some basics.
Now, I love to watch the odd Chinese action/Martial arts film and over time I've noticed a pattern. There seems to be a recurring theme of conflict between the north and the south broadly speaking.
The 'good guys' are mainly in the south, and the bad guys from the north. They are often referred to as Tartars or Manchu. Sometimes they are just a bad guy from the North.
This happened in some of the old and corny films with Gordon Liu in them, and up to some fairly recent films.


Am I missing something here?
 

heylouis

Ad Honorem
Apr 2013
6,397
China
#2
you see something like a north-south conflict, because, in history and speaking legend, the monks of south Shaolin temples were masters of Kungfu. they fighted Wokou and Manchu. in short, it is about legend of Shaolin not about north-south conflict.
 
Jan 2015
955
EARTH
#3
Is there still any regional rivalry in modern day China?

I have to admit to knowing next to nothing about Chinese history....beyond some basics.
Now, I love to watch the odd Chinese action/Martial arts film and over time I've noticed a pattern. There seems to be a recurring theme of conflict between the north and the south broadly speaking.
The 'good guys' are mainly in the south, and the bad guys from the north. They are often referred to as Tartars or Manchu. Sometimes they are just a bad guy from the North.
This happened in some of the old and corny films with Gordon Liu in them, and up to some fairly recent films.


Am I missing something here?
Because the Barbarians are from the North. So it's not really a regional thing. It just plays on the "Barbarian" theme every one else plays on when they make historical/fantasy movies.

The South was mostly subdued very early on. Rebellions broke out from these minorities or "barbarians" here and there - which almost always ended very badly for them. Most learned quickly. Some didn't.

Also, China is quite a large country with a gradient of culture. The more exotic the person is, the more easily he will fit the bad guy bill (if he speaks another Sinitic tongue). It adds to the mystery. It's just human psychology, methinks.
But I haven't really noticed this trend that much. I see more southern crooks in movies moreso than Northerners. If they are villains, they're usually not the main villain - just some side character. That's what I noticed.
 
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heylouis

Ad Honorem
Apr 2013
6,397
China
#4
Because the Barbarians are from the North. So it's not really a regional thing. It just plays on the "Barbarian" theme every one else plays on when they make historical/fantasy movies.

The South was mostly subdued very early on. Rebellions broke out from these minorities or "barbarians" here and there - which almost always ended very badly for them. Most learned quickly. Some didn't.

Also, China is quite a large country with a gradient of culture. The more exotic the person is, the more easily he will fit the bad guy bill (if he speaks another Sinitic tongue). It adds to the mystery. It's just human psychology, methinks.
But I haven't really noticed this trend that much. I see more southern crooks in movies moreso than Northerners. If they are villains, they're usually not the main villain - just some side character. That's what I noticed.
not necessarily barbarian, there are folk tales about south Shaolin and heaven and earth society. the people of the society were told to be brave man against government. many legends and novels about them. people just like these stories. those people were told to be based in southern China, either a coincidence of history or a result of the relatively better economy in the south
[ame=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_Shaolin_Monastery]Southern Shaolin Monastery - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/ame]
[ame=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiandihui]Tiandihui - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/ame]
 
Jan 2015
955
EARTH
#5
not necessarily barbarian, there are folk tales about south Shaolin and heaven and earth society. the people of the society were told to be brave man against government. many legends and novels about them. people just like these stories. those people were told to be based in southern China, either a coincidence of history or a result of the relatively better economy in the south
Southern Shaolin Monastery - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Tiandihui - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
First one is a myth, and I don't remember seeing that many movies about them. Could you tell me of a movie about that? Might jog my memory.

As for the second one, they're anti-Qing so I think it fits into the narrative of struggle against the "barbarian".
Also, most triads are portrayed as southerners.
 

heylouis

Ad Honorem
Apr 2013
6,397
China
#6
First one is a myth, and I don't remember seeing that many movies about them. Could you tell me of a movie about that? Might jog my memory.

As for the second one, they're anti-Qing so I think it fits into the narrative of struggle against the "barbarian".
Also, most triads are portrayed as southerners.
well, you know, the legends about south Shaolin are usually focused on the so called layman buddhists, the ones learn martial art from monks but not monks themselves. so it is normal, you can't tell the movies, i don't know when i was young too. whatever, it's fun, that's good enough, ha....
sorry, i have a bad memory on movie titles....and I really don't know the english title....maybe i can't give reminds.

the Shaolin may contain anti-Qing element too, well, it is complicate. in a recent tv show, the people fight against different governments during different time period. the essence is usually stuff like revenge, good guy win, bad guy lose.... Qing unfortunately suited as the last imperial government...
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
33,636
T'Republic of Yorkshire
#7
Well, historically, both the Ming and the Song were brought down by invasions from the north, so I suppose it's understandable why the the north is often depicted as the home of barbarian tribes.

Although you do sometimes get noble barbarians being depicted as well. I remember watching one series where the historical Akuta (Taizu of Jin) was depicted as an honorable man.
 

pablo668

Ad Honorem
Apr 2010
2,187
Perth, Western Australia. or....hickville.
#8
Thanks for the answers guys.

I myself figured it might be some kind of remnant of historical rivalries between regions that came out in the culture.
 
Dec 2011
3,492
Mountains and Jungles of Southern China
#9
Yes, there are still some rivalries between northerners and southerners, not just among Han Chinese and ethnic Mongols and Manchus, but also among northern and southern Chinese.

One interesting phenomenon that I noticed on Chinese internet forums is that it's often the northern Chinese who start the namecalling and verbal insult against the southerners, while most of the times the southerners would just ignore those insults.

I like southern peoples better. I think southern Chinese and southern ethnic minorities are more peaceful and friendly than northern Chinese and northern minorities.
 

heylouis

Ad Honorem
Apr 2013
6,397
China
#10
Yes, there are still some rivalries between northerners and southerners, not just among Han Chinese and ethnic Mongols and Manchus, but also among northern and southern Chinese.

One interesting phenomenon that I noticed on Chinese internet forums is that it's often the northern Chinese who start the namecalling and verbal insult against the southerners, while most of the times the southerners would just ignore those insults.

I like southern peoples better. I think southern Chinese and southern ethnic minorities are more peaceful and friendly than northern Chinese and northern minorities.
when did you cancelled the "south independence" declaration from your personal signature..........
 

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