IrishAfroAmericans

May 2011
13,981
Navan, Ireland
#41
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Looks strange. But
1.Many american negroes have Irish surnames
.....................................................?
I would have thought that welsh surnames--Jones, Williams etc--- were more common than Irish?
 
Sep 2012
1,074
Tarkington, Texas
#43
One argument against this female Irish breeding with Black Slaves is in Louisiana there was a definite shortage of available white women to marry. A white Irish woman would be in high demand. When the Lafitte Brothers came to Louisiana, Pierre Lafitte married a Free Black woman.

On a related note a couple of my ancestors were Irish. Elizabeth Ann Mahoney was from Lees Landing, Virginia and she married a Union Veteran named Heywood. This seems tame nowadays, but right after the ACW this would be noted! Here in Louisiana the majority of Black people should have French last names.

Pruitt
 
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Sep 2012
3,890
Bulgaria
#44
Regarding the Catholics in the Old South, I read Margaret Michel's 'Gone with the wind' as a youngster during the good ole commie days and i do remember that the main protagonist Scarlet O'Hara is a daughter of an Irish immigrant planter. I read recently that the Catholics in New York alone were more then Catholics in the whole of South and the antebellum New Yorkers in question were almost 100% of Irish descent, whilst in the New Orleans for example these were mostly of French descent. Most of the antebellum Irish lived in the North, NYC and Boston.
 

Theodoric

Ad Honorem
Mar 2012
2,895
#46
African American always sounded like a weird label to me. Usually when someone refers to their ancestral homeland, it is from a certain nation or tribe... even among people whose ancestors are from Africa.

It’s interesting, while technically a Kenyan American is an African living in the Americas, they wouldn’t necessarily be part of the “African American” group since the heritage is completely different. The reason is because African Americans don’t actually know which country they’re from. They don’t know their heritage; it was stolen from them. All that is left is the American experience, African American is effectively an American race.
 
Sep 2014
931
Texas
#47
Benjamin Bennecker was the grandson of an Irish woman and a freed Black man. He surveyed the US capital before it was built
James Beckwourth, famous mountain manm was the son of an English Lord and a slave woman. Lord Beckwourth moved to Missouri where he could set his family free. Apparently it was illegal to do that in Virginia. 1565969531068.png
 

Offspring

Ad Honorem
Mar 2013
8,104
România
#48
African American always sounded like a weird label to me. Usually when someone refers to their ancestral homeland, it is from a certain nation or tribe... even among people whose ancestors are from Africa.

It’s interesting, while technically a Kenyan American is an African living in the Americas, they wouldn’t necessarily be part of the “African American” group since the heritage is completely different. The reason is because African Americans don’t actually know which country they’re from. They don’t know their heritage; it was stolen from them. All that is left is the American experience, African American is effectively an American race.
I used to think someone needs to be partially African to be African American, but it seems it's enough to be partially Jamaican.
 
Jan 2014
1,093
Rus
#49
African American always sounded like a weird label to me. Usually when someone refers to their ancestral homeland, it is from a certain nation or tribe... even among people whose ancestors are from Africa.

It’s interesting, while technically a Kenyan American is an African living in the Americas, they wouldn’t necessarily be part of the “African American” group since the heritage is completely different. The reason is because African Americans don’t actually know which country they’re from. They don’t know their heritage; it was stolen from them. All that is left is the American experience, African American is effectively an American race.
There is something in it...Nobody says "European Americans"
 

Chlodio

Forum Staff
Aug 2016
4,320
Dispargum
#50
There is something in it...Nobody says "European Americans"
Actually I have heard "Euro-Americans" and have used it myself - when I find it awkward to use terms like 'white' or 'Caucasian.' One example is when discussing conflict between whites and Indians. You can't really say that the Indians fought Americans. That denies that the Indians were also Americans. Native Americans vs Euro-Americans makes more sense. It's especially helpful if you want to emphasize that the conflict was in the past and today the two groups have found common ground - both groups are Americans. Euro-Americans and Afro-Americans would emphasize the same thing - common ground. The tendency of Euro-Americans to just call ourselves Americans might actually emphasize the Afro-, Asian-, Latino-, and Native Americans are different somehow.
 
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