Is Alesia in Jura ?

May 2019
7
France
#11
Artifacts were planted there back in the 1800s to appease the Government.
That is my viewpoint and from several other researchers And views of maps.
I think that this theory of the "fake site" is not realist. Too many things were found in Alise, including with modern research (with foreing archeologists). For me, no doubt, there has been a siege there during the gaulish war, probably in 52bc or shortly after.
 
May 2019
7
France
#12
You cannot consider the text as historical only when it fits your theory.
Caesar had no other constraint, when writing the DBC, that promoting himself for his future political agenda. So when he describes facts which have no incidence on it, he is probably a trustable historian. For example when he says that the towers on the circumvallation and contravallation are distant of 40 ft, why not believe him ? BTW the towers at Alise are irregularly spaced and most of the time in the range 60 to 80 ft. I think that, as you said in your previous point, if we find proofs that the final battle of Alesia was in Chaux, the only logical explanation will be that Caesar did not write a word about the siege in Alise, and in my opinion, it can be only for political reason. So I don't try to adapt the text to my theory, I try to find the least possible modification of the text (including filling an omission hole) to fit with archaeological findings. As I'm involved in searching on the field in Chaux, with some others, I consider that we have already found pieces proof and we only need time and money to draw the complete sketch beetween the dots.

3- You say that Alesia is a common Gaulish word. It is not. We don't know if "Al├ęsia" comes from "alisier" (the tree) or from a word that would have meant "rock", but it is surely not a common word. Do you have an example ?
Xavier Guichard wrote a book (in 1936 I believe) named "Eleusis Alesia". He has found dozens (something beetween 50 and 100) of sites with a toponymic root "Alet" or "Ales", "Alaise", or "Alise", all refering, according to him to an ancient sacred geometry pattern drawn on the ground of celtic zone. Some are in England, some in western Europe, and even in Turkey ! So the "sacred site for the druids" associated with this toponym could be a reality. Some other linguist think that this root could be close of "falaise" in modern french, meaning vertical rockky zone. Obviously this last word could apply as well in Alise as in Chaux.
 
Jan 2011
1,048
FRANCE
#14
Caesar had no other constraint, when writing the DBC, that promoting himself for his future political agenda. So when he describes facts which have no incidence on it, he is probably a trustable historian. For example when he says that the towers on the circumvallation and contravallation are distant of 40 ft, why not believe him ? BTW the towers at Alise are irregularly spaced and most of the time in the range 60 to 80 ft. I think that, as you said in your previous point, if we find proofs that the final battle of Alesia was in Chaux, the only logical explanation will be that Caesar did not write a word about the siege in Alise, and in my opinion, it can be only for political reason. So I don't try to adapt the text to my theory, I try to find the least possible modification of the text (including filling an omission hole) to fit with archaeological findings. As I'm involved in searching on the field in Chaux, with some others, I consider that we have already found pieces proof and we only need time and money to draw the complete sketch beetween the dots.
You can be right, but the contrary could aslo be true. Who would have been interested in the fact that the towers were 40 ft away? It has no importance. But it shows that it was well organized, even if for some local geographical reasons it is not true. Now, if you find in Chaux towers 40 ft away from each other, it would be interesting.


Xavier Guichard wrote a book (in 1936 I believe) named "Eleusis Alesia". He has found dozens (something beetween 50 and 100) of sites with a toponymic root "Alet" or "Ales", "Alaise", or "Alise", all refering, according to him to an ancient sacred geometry pattern drawn on the ground of celtic zone. Some are in England, some in western Europe, and even in Turkey ! So the "sacred site for the druids" associated with this toponym could be a reality. Some other linguist think that this root could be close of "falaise" in modern french, meaning vertical rockky zone. Obviously this last word could apply as well in Alise as in Chaux.
What I meant is that the word "Alese" or similar is not attested in the common Gaulish language, so the etymology is speculative (X.Delamarre says so).
 

Similar History Discussions