Is Anatolia in middle east? (geographically)

Solidaire

Ad Honorem
Aug 2009
5,310
Athens, Greece
#61
Geographical definitions mean very little, they are just a convenient way to create common points of reference when communicating with each other. Some of these conventions are clear-cut because geography itself offers distinct features to separate and categorise regions, others not as much. Cultural implications often complicate geographical definitions, as people find it convenient to identify geographical regions with distinct cultures. Therefore, they are often subjective and may vary according to whom you ask, even change through time.

From my own perspective, Anatolia is very distinct from the Middle East, with which it borders. Anatolia, Asia minor, or Near East, coincides roughly with the Asiatic part of modern Turkey, the part of Asia that protrudes into the Mediterranean and the Black Sea. I think that the diagonal line that Afrasiyab spoke of above describes it well. Anatoli is the Greek word for sunrise/east, both in ancient and modern Greek, thus, the term is by definition referring to the land that lies east of the Greek lands. Aside from its geographical peninsular feature, it had always been a distinct cultural area, and still is. It is one of the most important areas in human history, a diachronic laboratory of civilisation and culture.
 
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sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
3,201
Sydney
#63
a better definition would be the Levant or the Near East , Middle East is more ore less mesopotamia , Iraq ,Iran the Arabian peninsula
 
#64
a better definition would be the Levant or the Near East , Middle East is more ore less mesopotamia , Iraq ,Iran the Arabian peninsula
Well its not the Levant, that's geographically impossible.

Its Asia Minor.

And that's the end of it.

Which is conveniently forgotten by those who try to class it as Europe for some weird reason.
 
Mar 2012
1,168
Magdeburg
#65
geographically, Culturally, religiously, Ethnically yes.

Care to elaborate? Since when anatolia was groupted together with lands to the south-east of its landmass?
Ethnically, are mongolians,kazaklhs,tatars..etc are also middle eastern?
Culturally... do you think turks are more middle eastern than balkan?

How many times have you been to turkey and how many turks did you meet in your life?
 
Mar 2016
661
Antalya
#66
Anatolia is an "n-junction" and is a migration end-point, from all directions. You can find descendants of Spanish Jews and Crimean Tatars in the same district. Turkish culture is the manifestation of multiculturalism, and it's hard to label or reduce it. Some notable migration to Turkey in recent (relatively speaking) history.

- Arabs from Syria (very recent, Syrian Civil War)
- Kurds from Iraq
- Turks from Balkans, Levant, Caucasus
- Bosniaks from Serbia
- Circassians (Cerkez) from Caucasus
- Crimean Tatars from Crimea

Earlier:
- Jews from Spain
- Minor migration from Africa

Let's consider we have

- Armenian
- Greeks
- and most importantly, an established ancient culture of Anatolia that even migrating Turkish overlords adopted.

What we also need to consider is migrating Turks (Seljuks) were basically a Persian-dominated culture with a Turkish twist. So we have to consider Persian culture as well.

Obviously, when people migrate, they just don't leave what they are accustomed (aka "culture") with behind. Anatolia is simply a mix of East and West. It maybe hard for some people to get it, then again, it started to really annoy me reading ignorant people with opinion.

Name me a country rivals this kind of richness when it comes to culture, I'll start calling Turkish culture as "Middle Eastern" or "Near Eastern" or "Balkanian".
 
Last edited:
Dec 2018
51
India
#67
Care to elaborate? Since when anatolia was groupted together with lands to the south-east of its landmass?
Asia Minor is it's one of the oldest name. orient stars from that place as well.

Anatolia is also part of MENA or Middle East


Ethnically, are mongolians,kazaklhs,tatars..etc are also middle eastern?
Central Asia Turks

Culturally... do you think turks are more middle eastern than balkan?
Middle Eastern historically, culturally, ethnically, religiously etc.


How many times have you been to turkey and how many turks did you meet in your life?
I have seen enough, and they dont look like "Balkanoid"s to me, unless they have some kind of ethnic connection to that place.
 
Mar 2012
1,168
Magdeburg
#68
Well you are gravenly mistaken. You are confusing a political zone with ethnicity. Besides, I do not think that you have seen "enough" turkish people since your judgment seems astronomically out of the place. Please do not comment on things that you have no idea about.

Middle Eastern historically, culturally, ethnically, religiously etc.
Magic word is "partly". Turks absorbed everything around them, that including genes. You are totally clueless.

I have seen enough, and they dont look like "Balkanoid"s to me, unless they have some kind of ethnic connection to that place.
No you haven't, and judging from your clueless post, i doubt if you have seen any at all. Again, don't comment on things that you have zero idea about.
 
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Dec 2018
51
India
#69
Well you are gravenly mistaken. You are confusing a political zone with ethnicity. Besides, I do not think that you have seen "enough" turkish people since your judgment seems astronomically out of the place. Please do not comment on things that you have no idea about.



Magic word is "partly". Turks absorbed everything around them, that including genes. You are totally clueless.



No you haven't, and judging from your clueless post, i doubt if you have seen any at all. Again, don't comment on things that you have zero idea about.
As I said before, I have seen enough Turks and balkanoids to make judgement on my own.

Now, if you desperately want to connect your people with Balkanoids due to inferiority complex or pretend to be same as White Europeans it's not my problem.
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
31,142
T'Republic of Yorkshire
#70
Well you are gravenly mistaken. You are confusing a political zone with ethnicity. Besides, I do not think that you have seen "enough" turkish people since your judgment seems astronomically out of the place. Please do not comment on things that you have no idea about.



Magic word is "partly". Turks absorbed everything around them, that including genes. You are totally clueless.



No you haven't, and judging from your clueless post, i doubt if you have seen any at all. Again, don't comment on things that you have zero idea about.
Knock off the naame calling, now.
 
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