Is Confucianism an example of secular conservatism?

Nov 2014
246
ph
#1
Is Confucianism an good example of a philosophy that is secularly conservative? Or a society that is conservative but derves its arguments from secular reasoning? Could Japan also be a good example of a culture that is conservative/traditional or resistant to change that bases its argument on secular reasoning? Or how about the Soviet Union, unlike say, evangelical Christianity, it was also socially conservative in some ways, buy it's arguments were also based on secular arguments.
 
Jul 2017
510
Sydney
#2
Soviet Union is an extreme, I believe, as they had no state religion and discouraged religiosity. In proper secularism, one would be free to practise whatever faith or atheism for that matter.

And yet the orthodox church has survived well in the Russian hinterland.

The communism in China too is very secular. But sometimes it borders on anti- religion, if we were to believe American reports that people in Xinjiang are being held in camps due to their religious attitude
 
Jun 2017
2,555
Connecticut
#3
Is Confucianism an good example of a philosophy that is secularly conservative? Or a society that is conservative but derves its arguments from secular reasoning? Could Japan also be a good example of a culture that is conservative/traditional or resistant to change that bases its argument on secular reasoning? Or how about the Soviet Union, unlike say, evangelical Christianity, it was also socially conservative in some ways, buy it's arguments were also based on secular arguments.
That's a great way to describe it. All the repressive and controlling culture, minus the supernatural justification for it being worth it. Not sure they really were looking at it through a secular vs religious lens, one colonialist historic issue us westerners had which caused a great deal of damage with was putting foreigners into the same boxes we'd identify ourselves with, like religion(hence India and Pakistan). It was just the values they taught for millennia and to get government jobs you had to take a test on the Confucian classics so it just kept getting more and more inbedded into the culture. You don't need to have the supernatural aspect for a philosophy to dominate a society, it makes it much easier for that to happen because of the persuasive appeal that comes from that but it's not necessary. It's possible something similar could have happened in the West with someone else's writings, and while we talk about how restricting religion was to the growth of the West, a stalwart loyalty to the idea's of classical age philosophers doesn't move society forward either and the Chinese perhaps show us a negative picture of what a Europe without the Dark Ages might have been like(say if the Carolingian Empire stayed together), a stable but repressive agrarian society.
 

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Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,285
Brassicaland
#4
Confucianism is much more complicated than most like to think.
On one side, we have progressives such as Wang Chong (王充) and Xun Kuang (荀況); on the other hand, Neo-Confucianism of the Song and Ming Dynasty is quite notorious.
 

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