Is feminism ruining the West?

Oct 2013
14,533
Europix
Have you read de Sade? Because modern sexual practices have nothing to do with de Sade.
Listen, I do not want to go on that line (simply because it's derailing the thread in my opinion). I simply gave an example, and I said "peculiar". An indefinite word. Generic. In the sense that no, we didn't invented everything these days, yes, "peculiar" practices were known in previous times too.
 
Jan 2014
2,577
Westmorland
OK, please articulate for me the differences between their positions on other matters.
Difficult to do, largely because Farage does not appear to have much of a position on any matter other than Brexit. He isn't a UK MP, so his voting record isn't available for scrutiny. He's no longer part of UKIP, but claims the Brexit party generally agrees with UKIP's manifesto.

Rees-Mogg's voting record is available for scrutiny. As you might expect for a somewhat traditional figure of the Tory right, he votes in favour of policies which one might generally regard as supporting self-reliance and against those which give the State a greater role. He personally seems to vote against the widening of equality measures, which perhaps places him at odds with Tory moderates. As I understand it, he doesn't generally defy the whips (other than on Brexit).

Farage's extremism is not just about his ideology (he probably shares Rees-Mogg's opposition to gay marriage, increasing welfare and restrictions on smoking, for example) but is also about his approach. Whereas Rees-Mogg is a man soaked in constitutional law and the conventions of Parliament, Farage rejects what he perceives to be 'the establishment' and instead adopts a highly populist approach which basically allows him to say what he likes when he likes.
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
35,066
T'Republic of Yorkshire
Difficult to do, largely because Farage does not appear to have much of a position on any matter other than Brexit. He isn't a UK MP, so his voting record isn't available for scrutiny. He's no longer part of UKIP, but claims the Brexit party generally agrees with UKIP's manifesto.

Rees-Mogg's voting record is available for scrutiny. As you might expect for a somewhat traditional figure of the Tory right, he votes in favour of policies which one might generally regard as supporting self-reliance and against those which give the State a greater role. He personally seems to vote against the widening of equality measures, which perhaps places him at odds with Tory moderates. As I understand it, he doesn't generally defy the whips (other than on Brexit).

Farage's extremism is not just about his ideology (he probably shares Rees-Mogg's opposition to gay marriage, increasing welfare and restrictions on smoking, for example) but is also about his approach. Whereas Rees-Mogg is a man soaked in constitutional law and the conventions of Parliament, Farage rejects what he perceives to be 'the establishment' and instead adopts a highly populist approach which basically allows him to say what he likes when he likes.
I'm even more confused now. If they're both working towards the same stated goal,. and working within the system (which they are - Farage isn't calling for revolution), then I simply don't see how Farage can be labelled an extremist. He has a pretty good track record on expelling racists from his party.

While it's true Farage has called other politicians failures and so forth for failing to carry out Brexit, that's no worse than what goes on in parliament every week, and he hasn't stooped to calling them liars or traitors.
 
Oct 2012
676
I'm even more confused now. If they're both working towards the same stated goal,. and working within the system (which they are - Farage isn't calling for revolution), then I simply don't see how Farage can be labelled an extremist. He has a pretty good track record on expelling racists from his party.

While it's true Farage has called other politicians failures and so forth for failing to carry out Brexit, that's no worse than what goes on in parliament every week, and he hasn't stooped to calling them liars or traitors.
I wouldn`t call neither an extremist. Both are quite far right and share many policies, but extemists, no.
 

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