Is God Immortal ?

tomar

Ad Honoris
Jan 2011
13,228
#1
This is for monotheists
For polytheists, I guess the same questions apply but on a case by case (god by god) basis

  • Is God (in your religion) immortal ?
  • Can he be killed/destroyed ?
  • Can he self destroy ?
  • Can he be incapacitated ?
  • Does he have ennemies ? What is their plan for winning if God cannot be destroyed/incapacitated ? Why do they keep up the fight under these conditions ?

What passages from relevant scripture support the answers to these questions ?
 

Recusant

Ad Honorem
Sep 2009
2,624
Sector N after curfew
#4
It can. Just destroy a little tiny bit of matter, and you create loads & loads of energy.
As far as I know, mass-energy equivalence (E=mc²) has not been falsified or overturned in any way.

"How Einstein's E=mc² Works (Infographic)" | LiveScience

Although the idea of a relationship between mass and energy was not new, in the early years of the 20th century, physicist Albert Einstein created a formula that was the first to correctly state that relationship. This practical information led to the creation of nuclear power reactors and atomic bombs.

This discovery basically states that the properties of mass and energy are interchangeable, and what people call matter is really just energy in a different form. The idea has some startling implications.

[Continues . . .]
However, it has yet to be shown that any deity is governed by the known laws of physics, so using an extrapolation of those laws to attempt to describe the nature of a deity is purely speculative.
 
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Nov 2010
6,218
Indiana
#5
As far as I know, mass-energy equivalence (E=mc²) has not been falsified or overturned in any way.

"How Einstein's E=mc² Works (Infographic)" | LiveScience



However, it has yet to be shown that any deity is governed by the known laws of physics, so using an extrapolation of those laws to attempt to describe the nature of a deity is purely speculative.
No God has ever been proven to operate outside of the laws of physics either. The question is in it self speculative. Any God/force acting within nature would by definition follow the laws of nature that it presumably created.
 
Oct 2013
6,210
Planet Nine, Oregon
#7
Most gods and goddesses can be killed by common sense, especially the anthropomorphic omnipotent, omniscient loving ones --human creations to offer meaning and comfort in a chaotic world.
 
Oct 2011
7,654
MARE PACIFICVM
#8
This question is of course entirely dependent on one's personal conception of God.

For me, God is what in the east is called the Dao.

To quote from Stephen Mitchell's translation of the Dao De Jing:

There was something formless and perfect before the universe was born. It is serene. Empty. Solitary. Unchanging. Infinite. Eternally present. It is the mother of the universe. For lack of a better name, I call it the Dao.
Whether we call it God or Dao or any other name is irrelevant. It is beyond name. It is the timeless, formless, the eternal... the unmanifest out of which all manifestations (including time and space) are born.


EDIT: Also, this is what Christ referred to when he said "Truly, truly, I say to you: before Abraham was, I AM."

The present tense (I am) is used as a way of referncing the eterally present. God neither was nor will be but only eternally is.
 
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Scaeva

Ad Honorem
Oct 2012
5,523
#9
Assuming the god is also the creator deity, wouldn't that mean that god also created time? Space and time are fused, so if a god created space he or she must have also created time.

If a god created time presumably he or she would not be bound by their creation.
 
May 2016
811
Vatican occupied America
#10
To be mortal or immortal one would have to be a life form. By nature a monotheistic God is beyond his creation and exists without being a life form.
Lol, one does not need a religion to be a Monotheist. Religions are man made.
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Pacific_Victory said:
Whether we call it God or Dao or any other name is irrelevant. It is beyond name. It is the timeless, formless, the eternal... the unmanifest out of which all manifestations (including time and space) are born.


EDIT: Also, this is what Christ referred to when he said "Truly, truly, I say to you: before Abraham was, I AM."

The present tense (I am) is used as a way of referncing the eterally present. God neither was nor will be but only eternally is.
You're confusing Pantheism which is really a variant form of Atheism which is combined with an axiom that live reincarnates to experience itself and is all really one being or mind. This is the most normal Pagan axiom and the foundation of: Hinduism; Buddhism; Gnosticism; Germanic Paganism and Luciferianism. The idea that man is God or can become God is the heart of it.
 

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