Is Han even an ethnicity?

heylouis

Ad Honorem
Apr 2013
6,538
China
one more point:
The additional point is given only to a minority ethnic group student if he is a minority and lives in a minority populated place eg Tibet and Xinjiang . A minority student who has lived all his/her life in a big city like Chengdu or Beijing is not awarded the extra points in exam.
not applied in the whole.country now.
in beijing, for high school entrance this modification is said to start since 2017. for university entrance, no time line set.
in other provinces, this is applied this year(or maybe in recent two years). some places like shandong will completely remove this in 2017.
 
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Zoopiter

Ad Honorem
Apr 2012
2,027
The idea was benign when it started. Places like Tibet have very harsh geography and very bad schools . even today in some places the Tibetan students families are paid money so their children can study instead of work .
But now i think the time has passed for this policy .
Lhasa and dege have godd schools so need for affirmative action.

one more point:
The additional point is given only to a minority ethnic group student if he is a minority and lives in a minority populated place eg Tibet and Xinjiang . A minority student who has lived all his/her life in a big city like Chengdu or Beijing is not awarded the extra points in exam.
That certainly sound a bit fairer. Does Han in minority populated place also got the same treatment, having additional 10 marks?
 
Dec 2011
3,492
Mountains and Jungles of Southern China
You have got to be kidding me. Aside from those people living in rural areas / belonging to the older end of the older generation and a handful of people in Hong Kong, almost everyone in Southern China today who is considered ethnically Han is able to speak Mandarin.

Even if they are unable to, stop acting as if all the other Chinese dialects spoken in Southern China are not in one way or another, Sinitic languages.

As Ceberus has mentioned, stop being delusional and claiming that you are "not Han" unless you have anything to prove that your recent ancestors are ethnically Zhuang / Dai etc.; "Southern China my beloved homeland, Baiyue and Baipu"; "Mountains and Jungles of Southern China" are equally as ridiculous.
There are still a few traceable non-sinitic words or expressions in some southern Chinese dialects, for example I heard that spider is called "lakkia" in one southern Chinese dialect, similar to the Austronesian word for spider.

But yes, overall the southern Chinese dialects are largely sinitic.

I'm fascinated by southern Chinese minority culture as well as SE Asian culture. And my ancestors came from the place where the Duzhang Man/Bo Ren (都掌蛮/僰人) once lived. It is said that they were related to Zhuang and Dai. But in 1573, the Ming Dynasty committed a horrendous genocide against the Duzhang Man, and that's the reason why they disappeared. This shows that the so-called Han were not much better than the Mongols or the Manchus that they often blamed (you know what I mean here).

But I don't think they are completely extinct, some of their bloodline had probably been left in southwestern Chinese and southern Chinese. I identify with the Duzhang Man.
 
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Jan 2015
955
EARTH
It is racist and stupid. You shouldn't give 10 more score for people in exam just because of his ethnic.
CCCP stupidity at it best.

Well, I daresay they're doing a bit better than the U.S when it comes to affirmative action in regards to professional and university entrance requirements.
 
Jun 2014
1,020
Earth
I'm fascinated by southern Chinese minority culture as well as SE Asian culture. And my ancestors came from the place where the Duzhang Man/Bo Ren (都掌蛮/僰人) once lived. It is said that they were related to Zhuang and Dai. But in 1573, the Ming Dynasty committed a horrendous genocide against the Duzhang Man, and that's the reason why they disappeared.
I am guessing you speak Chinese, read Chinese, understand Chinese, eat Chinese food, celebrate Chinese holidays?

So I think you and your recent ancestors are Sinified so that makes you Han. Whether you like it or not.

Han is an ethnic thing, not a racial one. So it doesn't matter if your ancestry does not lead you back to the Yellow River.
 

heylouis

Ad Honorem
Apr 2013
6,538
China
That certainly sound a bit fairer. Does Han in minority populated place also got the same treatment, having additional 10 marks?
no.......unless they lived in places listed as remote/mountain, where the education level is acknowledged to be poor.
 

heylouis

Ad Honorem
Apr 2013
6,538
China
There are still a few traceable non-sinitic words or expressions in some southern Chinese dialects, for example I heard that spider is called "lakkia" in one southern Chinese dialect, similar to the Austronesian word for spider.

But yes, overall the southern Chinese dialects are largely sinitic.

I'm fascinated by southern Chinese minority culture as well as SE Asian culture. And my ancestors came from the place where the Duzhang Man/Bo Ren (都掌蛮/僰人) once lived. It is said that they were related to Zhuang and Dai. But in 1573, the Ming Dynasty committed a horrendous genocide against the Duzhang Man, and that's the reason why they disappeared. This shows that the so-called Han were not much better than the Mongols or the Manchus that they often blamed (you know what I mean here).

But I don't think they are completely extinct, some of their bloodline had probably been left in southwestern Chinese and southern Chinese. I identify with the Duzhang Man.
so that is your own business.
you can identify yourself as non-han, and educate your sons to keep a distance from the han identity.
but you should not tell the other han to drop their recognization. and not until you really generate a great influence, your identification is meaningful only for yourself. you can provide little to differ from han and to find any in common with a minority group in existence.
 
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Feb 2015
266
Singapore
There are still a few traceable non-sinitic words or expressions in some southern Chinese dialects, for example I heard that spider is called "lakkia" in one southern Chinese dialect, similar to the Austronesian word for spider.

But yes, overall the southern Chinese dialects are largely sinitic.

I'm fascinated by southern Chinese minority culture as well as SE Asian culture. And my ancestors came from the place where the Duzhang Man/Bo Ren (都掌蛮/僰人) once lived. It is said that they were related to Zhuang and Dai. But in 1573, the Ming Dynasty committed a horrendous genocide against the Duzhang Man, and that's the reason why they disappeared. This shows that the so-called Han were not much better than the Mongols or the Manchus that they often blamed (you know what I mean here).

But I don't think they are completely extinct, some of their bloodline had probably been left in southwestern Chinese and southern Chinese. I identify with the Duzhang Man.
In Southern Min, "Ti1 Tu1" (蜘蛛) is generally used to refer to all types of spiders, similar to Mandarin "Zhi Zhu" with the exception that, like Old Chinese, there are no retroflex consonants (zh, sh, ch) in Southern Min. "La5 Gia5" (蟧蜈) is only used for big spiders with long, sometimes hairy legs known as the Heteropoda venatoria. It is a word of Sinitic origin that can be written out using Chinese characters and has no links to other Austronesian languages whatsoever.
 
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Dec 2011
3,492
Mountains and Jungles of Southern China
"La5 Gia5" (蟧蜈) is only used for big spiders with long, sometimes hairy legs known as the Heteropoda venatoria. It is a word of Sinitic origin that can be written out using Chinese characters.
But why other Sinitic dialects don't really have this word? I find the association with these two characters to be a bit far-fetched, seems more like a later invented association to accomodate for the pronunciation. And also, "蜈" in most Sinitic languages refers to the centipede, not the spider.
 
Feb 2015
266
Singapore
But why other Sinitic dialects don't really have this word? I find the association with these two characters to be a bit far-fetched, seems more like a later invented association to accomodate for the pronunciation. And also, "蜈" in most Sinitic languages refers to the centipede, not the spider.
Oh really? Guess what. "蟧蜈" (La5 Gia5 / Láo Wú) is also used in Mandarin IN CHINA to refer to the Heteropoda venatoria, which is known in full as "蟧蜈狩獵巨蟹蛛".