Is "Hibernophile" a Real Word?

Oct 2017
95
Mars
#1
Several questionable online sources say 'hibernophile' is a word for 'a person who is fond of Irish culture, Irish language and Ireland in general.' But, the word isn't in the dictionary. So, is it an acceptable word to use in an academic setting?

Thanks a million.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
4,703
Portugal
#2
First of all let me begin to say that English is not my mother language and my proficiency in it is quite medium.

It is the first time that I see the word, but the word has a prefix based on “Hibernia” that was the Roman designation of the island and the suffix “phile”, that means adept, like in Lusophile, Hispanophile, Francophile, Anglophile… so the word has the right construction.
 

Recusant

Ad Honorem
Sep 2009
2,624
Sector N after curfew
#4
Several questionable online sources say 'hibernophile' is a word for 'a person who is fond of Irish culture, Irish language and Ireland in general.' But, the word isn't in the dictionary. So, is it an acceptable word to use in an academic setting?

Thanks a million.
"Hibernophile" can be described as a nonce word despite fairly wide use. I would say that a strict reading of the generally accepted guideline that one should use formal language in academic writing would rule out "Hibernophile" since as you correctly point out, it's not in the dictionary. The Oxford English Dictionary does have "Hibernophobe," but it is explicitly denoted as a nonce word.

If you're going to be referring to the concept repeatedly in your paper it might be excused, since writing out something like "those who love and appreciate Ireland and Irish culture" repeatedly would be cumbersome and prolix, contrary to the desired conciseness of an academic paper. In which case you could proceed by explaining your usage early in the paper, defining "Hibernophile" (it should be capitalised) and noting that it will be used in the interest of brevity. I would think that this depends on what level of scrutiny your paper will receive though. For a master's thesis or a doctoral dissertation for instance, it might be advisable to avoid it.
 
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Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
4,703
Portugal
#5
"Hibernophile" can be described as a nonce word despite fairly wide use. I would say that a strict reading of the generally accepted guideline that one should use formal language in academic writing would rule out "Hibernophile" since as you correctly point out, it's not in the dictionary. The Oxford English Dictionary does have "Hibernophobe," but it is explicitly denoted as a nonce word.

If you're going to be referring to the concept repeatedly in your paper it might be excused, since writing out something like "those who love and appreciate Ireland and Irish culture" repeatedly would be cumbersome and prolix, contrary to the desired conciseness of an academic paper. In which case you could proceed by explaining your usage early in the paper, defining "Hibernophile" (it should be capitalised) and noting that it will be used in the interest of brevity. I would think that this depends on what level of scrutiny your paper will receive though. For a master's thesis or a doctoral dissertation for instance, it might be advisable to avoid it.
Hi Recusant,

Just by curiosity, by this line, I presume that the Oxford English Dictionary also doesn’t have the words that I mentioned, or others with similar construction: Lusophile, Hispanophile, Francophile, Anglophile, Germanophile, Sinophile…
 

Recusant

Ad Honorem
Sep 2009
2,624
Sector N after curfew
#6
Hi Recusant,

Just by curiosity, by this line, I presume that the Oxford English Dictionary also doesn’t have the words that I mentioned, or others with similar construction: Lusophile, Hispanophile, Francophile, Anglophile, Germanophile, Sinophile…
Anglophile, Francophile, Germanophile are all in the OED. On the other hand Hispanophile doesn't have its own listing but is under the heading of words using the Hispano- combining form (an element that contributes to the particular sense of words). Sinophile is in this category as well. Both Luso- and Hiberno- are listed as combining forms but in these instances the quotes supplied use a hyphen, as in "I have stressed the unity that Latin America possesses in virtue of its Luso-Hispanic inheritance," and "This family of remote Hiberno-British princelings wished to make clear its claim to Roman status." Neither of these entries contain the words "Lusophile" or "Hibernophile."
 
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Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
4,703
Portugal
#7
Anglophile, Francophile, Germanophile are all in the OED. On the other hand Hispanophile doesn't have its own listing but is under the heading of words using the Hispano- combining form (an element that contributes to the particular sense of words). Sinophile is in this category as well. Both Luso- and Hiberno- are listed as combining forms but in these instances the quotes supplied use a hyphen, as in "I have stressed the unity that Latin America possesses in virtue of its Luso-Hispanic inheritance," and "This family of remote Hiberno-British princelings wished to make clear its claim to Roman status."
Thanks for the answer.