Is it right to pander to opinions on social networks ?

tomar

Ad Honoris
Jan 2011
13,893
There are multiple examples of even minor events going "viral" and creating a significant amount of discussions/traffic on various social networks. (SN)

In such cases, often times, we see companies or politicians react (especially when outrage is expressed on the SN): this may lead to various outcomes including people being fired or being made to resign, or to various new pieces of legislation being introduced.

The question is : is right for communities / companies / politicians etc... to react to such events simply because they are widely discussed on SN ? Is this simply taking into account the legitimate grievances of electors/clients or does this lead to mob rule ?
 
Mar 2019
1,948
Kansas
There are multiple examples of even minor events going "viral" and creating a significant amount of discussions/traffic on various social networks. (SN)

In such cases, often times, we see companies or politicians react (especially when outrage is expressed on the SN): this may lead to various outcomes including people being fired or being made to resign, or to various new pieces of legislation being introduced.

The question is : is right for communities / companies / politicians etc... to react to such events simply because they are widely discussed on SN ? Is this simply taking into account the legitimate grievances of electors/clients or does this lead to mob rule ?
It really depends on the issue. For example the Keystone pipeline protests, social media played an excellent role in getting the protesters grievances out there.

On the other hand occasionally I see mentions of some random person who has been torturing dogs and encouraging acts of violence against the person. First SN is driving vigilante retaliation against a person that as far as we know there is no evidence the person did the things claimed (Outside the poster on SN)