Is Sanskrit really an Indo-European language???

Jan 2016
1,065
Collapsed wave
#21
Here some basics about the indo-european languages family told in fun way:

Tim Doner - Family Matters: A Look at the Indo-European Languages

 
Sep 2014
773
Texas
#22
The Mittani were Vedic Indians, and I use Hindu stories as counter balances to ancient Irish ones. Ashva is horse in Vedic and Modern Indian, the Hittites used the word Aswa because the Mittani horses were so superior to the ones they used. Agnis the fire god survives in ignite of the Romans. Medhu- honey in India survives as mead in the Germanic tongues.

Naturally the language of the Vedic Indians was influenced by the Dravidians. And if you need any further proof that the people of northern India are descents of the IndoEuropeans, look at the DNA studies.
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-Faa4sVFWpOk/TkRIQSwa-WI/AAAAAAAACe0/NxX0gCf8iYI/mtdnamapworld.jpg this is mtDNA of the world. The pale green is Dravidian, but Northern India shows its IE ancestry
And Y groups are also shown...Y is the male lineage.

My specialty is the Indian horse, the Marwari and to a lesser degree the Kathiawari, but you can not study horses without studying the people who owned them.
 

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Dec 2017
474
Australia
#24
I dont see any cognates though. Their script is different and so is the sentence formation.:eek:
As an example.

An excerpt of Sanskrit text from an exercise in comparative linguistics. Every word in the text has a cognate in Slavic and Baltic languages. Not all words are obvious cognates and you will need to analyse them to recogise the cognates.


----


"...Dame vidhavā jīvati. Damas navas asti. Dame agni asti: vidhavā damam tāpayati. Catvāras sinavas na santi dame: avikās pāsanti prastāre. Navā snuṣā na budhyate: supyate. Vidhavā etām snuṣām bodhayati: “Paca mānsam!” iti. Snuṣā havate: “Devaras, bharata avikām!” iti. “Katarām?” iti. “Tām tanukām, devaras” iti. Trayas devaras jīvām avikām bharanti. Avikā ravati. Devaras etām avikām mārayanti. Snuṣā meṣam darati, mānsam pacati, dhūme vartayati. Vidhavā sūnum havati: “Vaha madhu!” iti nodayati. Sūnus ravati: “Nūnam, mātar!” iti. Sūnus madhu vahati. Vidhavā sinum sādayati, snuṣā devaram pāyayati. Nūnam catvarās adakās sīdanti, mānsam adanti, madhu giranti. “Madhūpītis jīvayati, mātar!” iti ravanti...
 
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Dec 2017
474
Australia
#25
In fact, the text above was given in linguistic Olympaid to school students in mid 60s to mid 70s in USSR :http://www.slovomania.ru/doc/lingv_1965_1975.pdf

In Sansrit grivam is neck. In Russian griva is mane that you will find on horse's neck. :)

There are so many cognate in Slavic languages. Let alone in all European languages collectively. I doubt anyone knows the number. Some more cognates from the document above.

lingv_1965_1975.pdf.png
 
Dec 2017
474
Australia
#26
Another common linguistic feature between Balto-Slavic languages and Sanscrit. Sanscrit has 8 cases. Balto-Slavic languages 7 cases. No other European language has that many cases at present. Many cases were lost in other European languages.
 
Dec 2018
53
India
#27
To me Sanskrit sounds closer to Avastan, Eastern spavic and balto-slavic languages.

I don't think that it's related to any language west of Russian or Polish.
 

Devdas

Ad Honorem
Apr 2015
4,150
India
#28
In fact, the text above was given in linguistic Olympaid to school students in mid 60s to mid 70s in USSR :http://www.slovomania.ru/doc/lingv_1965_1975.pdf

In Sansrit grivam is neck. In Russian griva is mane that you will find on horse's neck. :)

There are so many cognate in Slavic languages. Let alone in all European languages collectively. I doubt anyone knows the number. Some more cognates from the document above.
Neck is referred as Griva or Gardan in Hindi also. -am suffix is put in Sanskrit words to refer to a third person or a non-living thing.
 
May 2013
1,719
The abode of the lord of the north
#29
The Mittani were Vedic Indians, and I use Hindu stories as counter balances to ancient Irish ones. Ashva is horse in Vedic and Modern Indian, the Hittites used the word Aswa because the Mittani horses were so superior to the ones they used. Agnis the fire god survives in ignite of the Romans. Medhu- honey in India survives as mead in the Germanic tongues.

Naturally the language of the Vedic Indians was influenced by the Dravidians. And if you need any further proof that the people of northern India are descents of the IndoEuropeans, look at the DNA studies.
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-Faa4sVFWpOk/TkRIQSwa-WI/AAAAAAAACe0/NxX0gCf8iYI/mtdnamapworld.jpg this is mtDNA of the world. The pale green is Dravidian, but Northern India shows its IE ancestry
And Y groups are also shown...Y is the male lineage.

My specialty is the Indian horse, the Marwari and to a lesser degree the Kathiawari, but you can not study horses without studying the people who owned them.
Except, even by Indian sources, they always used to rely on lands to their North-west for better horses, such as Kamboja, Ashvakayanas, and ultimately persia also. This is despite them having enough capability to breed horses themselves. Perhaps geography or climate of the Indian mainland was not suited for good breeding of horses.
 

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