Is Shalwar Kameez a Punjabi dress?

Mar 2019
1,809
KL
sorry i want to make few amendments here

the above painting dont really show baggy pants, but they do show loose pants and leggings like churidar.

when it comes to baggy pants, both pajamas and shalwar can vary in their ''bagginess''

here are pajamas which are clearly baggy, if they are loose then shalwars clearly resemble these types of pajamas

1552836503689.png

maybe we have been wearing pajamas all along while calling them shalwar kameez and the balochs only wearing the true shalwars as baggy pants.

until there is evidence of such types of pajamas from pre islamic periods, one may assume that baggy trousers didn't exist in india, there are some paintings which depict loose garments like dhoti but its hard to distinguish if they are stitched or unstitched. So there is a chance that shalwar may have arrived and got tailored in south asia, where as i think kameez is strictly of south asian origins.

regards
 
Mar 2019
1,809
KL
here we go, baggy trousers like shalwar confirmed, indians did wear them

chandraketugarh, west Bengal, 1-2 BC buddha

1552900753507.png

Chandraketugarh terracotta, Shunga Era, One of the oldest depictions of the Buddha
 
Mar 2019
1,809
KL
1554324914880.png

11th century AD, alchi monastry paining.

here you go, probably rajputs or kashmiris or punjabis wearing shalwar even before islamic conquest.

so in short, it is pretty dumb to suppose that afghans wore shalwars, while their eastern neighbours followed totally different customs. The north western india, the afghanistan/kabul region was even ruled by the same dynasty for a certain time called hindu shahis

discriminating iranic afghans and non iranic indo aryan Punjabis or rajputs seems to be pretty dumb, as linguistics were not enough reasons for declaring a particular group of people such as Punjabis, kashmiris, rajputs adhering to completely different customs.

shalwar which is a perian word seems to be a general word for ''pants'' which may not be baggy, the original word sirwal comes from arabic which is semitic. Arabs/semites also knew shalwars and it is also proven through bronze age carvings like this one. Its also assumed that pants were introduced to arabia by the iranians jut because a lot of south arabian carving depicts dhoti wearers.

1554325431392.png

so shalwars might not even be an iranic dress to begin with as scythians were not known for wearing ''shalwars''

regards
 
Last edited:
Mar 2019
1,809
KL
Kanishka statue wearing shalwar, excavated from afghanistan

1554334200162.png

this is the baloch type shalwar we are talking about and not the preent day afghani shalwar

1554334255843.png

Kanishka statue mathura which shows typical indian dressing, this shows that he is not wearing scythian clothing but typically indian one, as indian kings used to wear, this resembles the achkan dressing

1554334639084.png

ujjain coin

1554334822435.png

achkan
1554334346684.png

kanishka shalwar vs afghani shalwar in present day afghanistan feel the difference?

this looks more like the turk dressing which is quoted

1554334513715.png
 

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,817
New Delhi, India
It is a Central Asian steppe dress. Probably Aryans brought it here. Must have come to India millenniums before Muslims.
Baggy or tight, fashions change. :)
 

Devdas

Ad Honorem
Apr 2015
5,006
India
Kanishka statue wearing shalwar, excavated from afghanistan

View attachment 17206

this is the baloch type shalwar we are talking about and not the preent day afghani shalwar

View attachment 17208

Kanishka statue mathura which shows typical indian dressing, this shows that he is not wearing scythian clothing but typically indian one, as indian kings used to wear, this resembles the achkan dressing

View attachment 17213

ujjain coin

View attachment 17214

achkan
View attachment 17210

kanishka shalwar vs afghani shalwar in present day afghanistan feel the difference?

this looks more like the turk dressing which is quoted

View attachment 17212
The Turkish dressing sense not at all resemble the clothing culture in South Asia and Afghanistan.
 
Mar 2019
1,809
KL
i just noticed one important thing in relation to kameez especially

the afghani women tunics dont have side slits


1557479419902.png

this dress essentially looks like a female frock

1557479506449.png

these frock like tunics have been worn ince bronze ages, what distinguishes these tunics from kameez is their slits most of all

kameez and kurta have side slits which is mandatory, all female dresses in Indian subcontinent proper have those side slits which is not the case with pashtun women dresses

here is Pashtun khattak dance attire, again their shirts have no side slits as well, which leads me to believe that afghani/pashtun dresses/tunics didn't originally have side slits.

1557479147268.png

In the OP's link, practically one guy in the picture wears the side slit shirt

1557479699567.png

it suggests to me that this guy is probably wearing a different attire compared to the rest of the men exhibited here, because his shirt doesnt have the length and has slits. his dress fitting is also much tailored and fitting compared to loose fiting of the rest.

al beruni also describes kurta as a shirt which doesnt go beyond a certain length and has slits on both ends.

regards
 
Mar 2019
1,809
KL
one more thing i noticed above is look at the fitting which is way high up chest level from common afghani tunics, the kameez fitting is atleast to the waist level

regards