Is Social Media a social evil?

Oct 2018
1,209
Adelaide south Australia
#1
Let me first define what I DON'T mean by "social media":

'Social media refers to websites and applications that are designed to allow people to share content quickly, efficiently, and in real-time.'

Learn What Social Media Is and How to Use It to Grow Your Business


Here, 'social media' means those platforms which are often used to limit face-to-face contact with others. I do not include internet forums, as I consider forums common interest platforms where one-on-one personal contact is limited.

I do not use social media. About 8 years ago, I used facebook for about a month. I kept getting all these friend invitations from people I didn't know. I only friended people I had actually met. That was not why I stopped using Facebook. There were two reasons; I saw and still see, how Facebook and Twitter are used to harm others, sometimes to the point of suicide.

The second reason came to me as I saw some of the personal things people posted, together with the realisation of the actual purpose of Facebook: A data mining application, the goal of which was and is to make Mark Zuckerberg rich. I also concluded Facebook is not a trustworthy place to post anything at all. I have been proved right.

Twitter is probably worse because of its immediacy.

I do not advocate banning these platforms. Sometimes we can too far too quick to ban things.This is usually done in the mistaken belief that laws will quickly change behaviour and attitudes. I would like to see Facebook and Twitter simply fad away. I think this is unlikely , because human beings en masse are ineffably stupid.

I think each of those platforms is a social evil society can do without. It also my belief that we have entered an age in which privacy and other civil liberties are being eroded at an alarming rate.. A red light is when you hear or read "if you haven't done anything wrong, you've nothing to fear".Worth remembering the US Fifth Amendment, and other such rights to silence exist to protect the innocent..

There is a fascinating set of lectures on Youtube, given by a Law professor, called "Don't talk to the Police". It's about the Fifth Amendment, but is also true of any right to silence.

OF COURSE I realise that my realist./ cynical view may simply be due to the conservatism often found in older people. I welcome alternate views.


 
Likes: Solidaire

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
6,094
US
#2
Is social media the cause of many of today's social ills or merely a symptom? Do people choose to communicate through social media because there are no others options (for most) or because they prefer this form of communication?
 

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
4,709
Sydney
#3
It only reveal human conditions , in real times
all people are idiot ten minutes a day , most people are idiots but for ten minutes a days
why should the obvious truth not be made manifest
from light come wisdom
 

AlpinLuke

Forum Staff
Oct 2011
26,576
Italy, Lago Maggiore
#4
First of all the human being is social and we want to communicate, to keep in touch and to become famous [to get audience]. Internet has made a social technology available for all. And it has met a remarkable global demand.

Second, Facebook is a private business, so it will carry on until people will use it. No one is legally forced to have a Facebook account. I've got one, but I uses it just to register in other apps ... it's years I don't post on my FB page. It's an environment I don't lake. Period.

But to sustain that FB is a social evil is a bit too much. It's a phenomenon of our time, nothing else.

When I was a child there was who accused TV to transform persons in addicted individuals who spent hours and hours in front of a TV set ...
 
Oct 2013
14,420
Europix
#5
OF COURSE I realise that my realist./ cynical view may simply be due to the conservatism often found in older people.
Nope, it's not cynicism, conservativism, old age You're expressing. It's common sense.

I was against the facedebouq idea since the. But I did made a (fake) account, to see it from inside (You know, it's better to use primary sources, if available ... ). So first thing was to do what we never do: read the terms and conditions (You know, that long pages that we scroll as quickly as possible to push that damn "agree" button).

I'm sure Stalin would had never dreamed about knowing and controlling at that level; not even after 10 bottles of vodka coupled with 10 joints.

It is a huge progress in knowledge: "they" no longer have to go to look for information, we are eager to furnish it. And not only the information on ourselves, but on others. Without their consent.


What kinds of information do we collect?

We collect the content, communications and other information you provide when you use our Products [...]

We collect information about the people, Pages, accounts, hashtags and groups that you are connected to and how you interact with them [...]

We collect information about how you use our Products, such as the types of content that you view or engage with, the features you use, the actions you take, the people or accounts you interact with and the time, frequency and duration of your activities. [...]

we collect information about the purchase or transaction. This includes payment information, such as your credit or debit card number and other card information, other account and authentication information, and billing, delivery and contact details. [...]

We also receive and analyse content, communications and information that other people provide when they use our Products. This can include information about you, [...]

we collect information from and about the computers, phones, connected TVs and other web-connected devices you use that integrate with our Products, and we combine this information across different devices that you use. [...]

Information that we obtain from these devices includes:
information such as the operating system, hardware and software versions, battery level, signal strength, available storage space, browser type, app and file names and types, and plugins. [...]


unique identifiers, device IDs and other identifiers, such as from games, apps or accounts that you use, [...]

Bluetooth signals, information about nearby Wi-Fi access points, beacons and mobile phone masts. [...]

information such as the name of your mobile operator or ISP, language, time zone, mobile phone number, IP address, connection speed and, in some cases, information about other devices that are nearby or on your network, [...]

But the most magnificient paragraph is this one:

Advertisers, app developers and publishers can send us information through Facebook Business Tools that they use, including our social plugins (such as the Like button), Facebook Login, our APIs and SDKs, or the Facebook pixel. These partners provide information about your activities off Facebook – including information about your device, websites you visit, purchases you make, the ads you see and how you use their services – whether or not you have a Facebook account or are logged in to Facebook.

(source: Terms of Service)
 
Last edited:
Oct 2013
14,420
Europix
#6
When I was a child there was who accused TV to transform persons in addicted individuals who spent hours and hours in front of a TV set ...
On average, American adults are watching five hours and four minutes of television per day.
(source: How Much Do We Love TV? Let Us Count the Ways)

8 hours sleep + 8 hours work + 5 hours TV ... that's leaving 3 hours per day for everything else ...
 
Oct 2018
1,209
Adelaide south Australia
#7
Is social media the cause of many of today's social ills or merely a symptom? Do people choose to communicate through social media because there are no others options (for most) or because they prefer this form of communication?
Yes. Very Durkheimian answer; I hadn't thought of anomie, but it 's a pretty good explanation.

Not a common term, so I've added a definition in case you're not familiar.

Anomie (/ˈænəˌmi/) is a "condition in which society provides little moral guidance to individuals".[1] It is the breakdown of social bonds between an individual and the community, e.g., under unruly scenarios resulting in fragmentation of social identity and rejection of self-regulatory values.[2][citation needed] .

Anomie - Wikipedia
 
Likes: Rodger

AlpinLuke

Forum Staff
Oct 2011
26,576
Italy, Lago Maggiore
#8
On average, American adults are watching five hours and four minutes of television per day.
(source: How Much Do We Love TV? Let Us Count the Ways)

8 hours sleep + 8 hours work + 5 hours TV ... that's leaving 3 hours per day for everything else ...
TV is a social drug. And to be scientific, psychologists could underline that TV puts a lot of images in our brains which are not our images. This is not positive for human mind, actually. A basic sector of human brains works on images. If those images are not from reality, but from TV ... the damage is almost sure ... now, it depends also on the brain. Usually a common human brain can manage the invasion of TV images, but there is a percentage of individuals who are not able to do that ...
 
Oct 2013
14,420
Europix
#9
Yes. Very Durkheimian answer; I hadn't thought of anomie, but it 's a pretty good explanation.

Not a common term, so I've added a definition in case you're not familiar.

Anomie (/ˈænəˌmi/) is a "condition in which society provides little moral guidance to individuals".[1] It is the breakdown of social bonds between an individual and the community, e.g., under unruly scenarios resulting in fragmentation of social identity and rejection of self-regulatory values.[2][citation needed] .

Anomie - Wikipedia
I'll add something to that: anonymously.

The www is a place where is possible to (re)act without any constraint that we find in real world. Because we are (or think we are, we feel like being) anonymous.

True story: José Cura, a great tenor, was booed once for "missing" a high C. He looked to the backstage, and said:
"Turn on the lights in the hall! Now!"
He came on the front of the stage and said to the audience:
"Now, with the lights on, face to face: boo me!"
No sound came from the hall ...
 
Likes: bboomer
Oct 2018
1,209
Adelaide south Australia
#10
TV is a social drug. And to be scientific, psychologists could underline that TV puts a lot of images in our brains which are not our images. This is not positive for human mind, actually. A basic sector of human brains works on images. If those images are not from reality, but from TV ... the damage is almost sure ... now, it depends also on the brain. Usually a common human brain can manage the invasion of TV images, but there is a percentage of individuals who are not able to do that ...
I didn't realise it was that much, but it sounds about right for when I was growing up, and while I worked. I had to have an escape, first from a ghastly school, and later from a stressful job.

Today, with heaps of choice, from free to air, a large DVD collection, a larger collection in MP4 and Netflix, it's closer to 2 hours a day. I get bored. Today my TV watching is based on a Darwinian concept. I call it "survival of the interesting'. A show hasten minutes to capture my interest. :)
 

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