Is technological growth currently stagnating?

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,329
Florania
#22
Don't confuse virtual life with real life.

It takes 24 hours to reach Australia from Italy. To make a call phone to Australia costed a lot ... now there is Whats... OK ... but it takes 24 hours to reach [physically] Australia from Italy.

It was the same in the 70's ...

What has been invented in the last 30 years which has improved the life of a common Italian?

Toilet paper existed 30 years ago!

Internet? Common Italians consider internet something exotic, an American invention [so something bad, like GMO ...].

I keep on saying that when I was a child I lived exactly like now. May be I was a very rich child, I don't know, but I don't see any real pragmatical advance [a part the virtual world of communication] from that far past.
We should ask ourselves: why things have not improved much (physically) in the last 40 years?
When we last flew back from to Fort Lauderdale, Florida, back to where we live, we thought the flights were ponderously slow, and this was exacerbated by the fact that there was no in-flight entertainment units.
We have NOT improved comfort nor speed of airplane flights!
Self-driving cars are upcoming, and we would like to see how they change the world as we know it.
They assume passengers to use their own tablets and cell phones today.
I celebrate that multimedia (including many books) are available on the Internet today.
 

Fantasus

Ad Honorem
Jan 2012
2,381
Northern part of European lowland
#23
Also ask why all forms of technology should grow. Perhaps in many cases it is not that necessary or even desirable, while there may be other fields where more changes should be appreciated. So: is technological evolution necesssarily for the good and when is it? When is itr not?
 
Feb 2017
203
Canada
#24
Nope. If anything we're likely at the dawn of an explosion in new technology.

The internet only became a major force in the past few decades, it's ability to spread information should have a huge multiplicative effect on innovation.
 
Oct 2013
6,190
Planet Nine, Oregon
#25
Nope. If anything we're likely at the dawn of an explosion in new technology.

The internet only became a major force in the past few decades, it's ability to spread information should have a huge multiplicative effect on innovation.
And it already is! Look at all of us. Scientists and many other people are meeting and exchanging information at an unprecedented rate. In the "recent" past weeks could pass between communications. Also many novel connections will be made, at a faster rate. Now we demand instantaneity!
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,328
San Antonio, Tx
#26
I don't agree. ICT is radically different to even ten or twenty years ago. IPv6 is still not being rolled out, and we will see kitchen devices soon which are Internet-capable.

We have electric cars, and even solar-powered cars on the market.

I think technological progress is still rapid.
I agree. I don’t see a slowing down of technological change at all. Technology sometimes does make very great strides, then it plateaus, after which a period of consolidation and exploitation takes over before the next great leap occurs. Progress is usually uneven and unpredictable even as it continues. Human conflict, paradoxically, perhaps, often leads to dramatic technological change. Radar, sonar and gun-laying technology as well as cryptology led to computers, etc. We know that change is constant but we don’t know which of these changes are going to lead to the next Great Leap Forward.
 

jackydee

Ad Honorem
Jan 2013
4,569
Brigadoon
#27
Nope. If anything we're likely at the dawn of an explosion in new technology.

The internet only became a major force in the past few decades, it's ability to spread information should have a huge multiplicative effect on innovation.
I agree with this. I think the big advancement will be due, not just to the internet, but also the growing literacy, education and economic standards in Asia. Thirty years ago North America and Europe did most of the heavy lifting in terms of technological advancement. We are about to see millions of clever Asian folk added to humanity's ability to advance technologically.
 
Oct 2013
6,190
Planet Nine, Oregon
#28
I agree. I don’t see a slowing down of technological change at all. Technology sometimes does make very great strides, then it plateaus, after which a period of consolidation and exploitation takes over before the next great leap occurs. Progress is usually uneven and unpredictable even as it continues. Human conflict, paradoxically, perhaps, often leads to dramatic technological change. Radar, sonar and gun-laying technology as well as cryptology led to computers, etc. We know that change is constant but we don’t know which of these changes are going to lead to the next Great Leap Forward.
Or complete destruction! I for one don't think we will make it without some kind of help. Evidence on my side! :)
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,328
San Antonio, Tx
#29
Internet? Common Italians consider internet something exotic, an American invention [so something bad, like GMO ...].
Those evil Americans! How dare they invent the Internet. Don’t know about Italy, but the Internet is ubiquitous around here. Yeah, there’s a lot of trash available, but there is the world’s knowledge available at your fingertips as well. To avoid the trash, just don’t look.

An iPhone today has more computing power than was used to send the Apollo Astronauts to the moon and it fits in the palm of your hand.

When I was a child, I flew across the Atlantic in 1950 in a KLM Constellation which barely made it to Gander, Newfoundland before heading south along the American east coast to Curaçao.

Thirty years later, I boarded a Boeing 747SP in New York and landed after a non-stop flight in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. That’s change and that’s progress. We took the same plane type to Australia.

The Concorde might have changed all that with its awesome speed, but it carried too few passengers to be economical and so it died an early death. Just because “you can”, doesn’t mean “you should”.

I keep on saying that when I was a child I lived exactly like now. May be I was a very rich child, I don't know, but I don't see any real pragmatical advance [a part the virtual world of communication] from that far past.
Back in the Bad Old Days when someone would come into the room and breathlessly tell you that you have a “long distance call”, you would drop everything and rush to the phone because those calls were expensive and important. Today I can call my brother in Brussels on Skype and pay exactly nothing for that call. That’s change, and that’s progress.

In the 60s, gasoline in the Houston area cost 25 cents a gallon. Today, that same gallon costs me about $2.20/gallon in San Antonio, but my car - a hybrid - gets more than double - triple the mileage and our cars are much safer and feature packed than ever. So while gasoline is more expensive, there is no comparison between automobile of at era and those of today: seat belts, rear view cameras, computer controlled engines, led lights and so on.

Of course, all change is not necessarily good or positive. More on that later.
 

MrKap

Ad Honorem
Aug 2011
2,353
#30
AI is already here.

You can enter a conversation with a chat bot on any computer these days, and they can do a pretty good job of fooling you.

I sometimes think technology has been lost several times over in our ancient past. Probably to be uncovered by a few select at times.

Anyhoo. A simple AI machine might be a vibration meter listening to sound, and based on a listening to a sound sample, it might play back a predetermined recording. That's pretty simple.