Is the entry of women into the labor force a bad thing?

Nov 2014
287
ph
#1
In terms of decreasing wage rates for the men in the labor force, if the demand for jobs was constant, then having half of the population expanding the supply would lower wages, on the other hand maybe the entry of women into the labor force would also cause an increase in new services, thus an increase in demand for jobs, and leaving wage rates roughly constant? I actually sort of got the idea from this article.
Liberal Societies Have Dangerously Low Birth Rates
 

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,536
US
#2
In today's society, no. Historically or traditionally, women labored in certain designated jobs, for the most part. The emphasis for the need for men to hold the majority of the jobs , especially the better paying ones, was based upon the fact that a man needed labor that would provide for his family. In a way, this system was likely one of many to encourage or reward men who stayed committed to the the woman with whom he procreated and the children he created so society did not have to. In today's world, many women need to labor to provide for their family because men won't. One can argue about the need for two income families, but that is the reality today and this isn't going to change. Once you remove gender from the equation, a question such as, 'does women in the workforce deflate labor?' becomes irrelevant.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
4,859
Portugal
#3
In terms of decreasing wage rates for the men in the labor force, if the demand for jobs was constant, then having half of the population expanding the supply would lower wages, on the other hand maybe the entry of women into the labor force would also cause an increase in new services, thus an increase in demand for jobs, and leaving wage rates roughly constant? I actually sort of got the idea from this article.

Liberal Societies Have Dangerously Low Birth Rates
Similar reasoning can be made with the slaves… if the slaves stayed slaves with their lower productivity the wage rates of the men that weren’t slaves probably could rise or at least not fall. Wasn’t that the fear expressed by many in the 19th century?

Also in the 20th century we could made a similar reasoning with the robots and the mechanization in the factories…

So… best political decision: we could maintain slavery, the women at home cooking and forbid any kind of mechanization/robotization. We can make a pool to see who agrees with this measures.
 

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