Is the Jewish Holocaust during WW2 unique and different from other genocides?

Is the Jewish Holocaust unique from other genocides?


  • Total voters
    73
Nov 2014
192
United States
Is the Jewish Holocaust during WW2 unique and/or different from other genocides that have taken place in history?
 
Jul 2015
892
Netherlands
It was different mostly in that it was quickly so widely recognised by global society as such (a genocide). In fact, I believe Raphael Lemkin invented the term for it when WWII was still going on.
 

Lawnmowerman

Ad Honorem
Mar 2010
9,842
Yes. It was industrialised. All genocides both before and after were simply go there kill everyone. Where as in the holocaust it was round them up put them on special trains and send them to the camps.
 

Belgarion

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,771
Australia
Yes, it was different. Not in its aim of extermination, but in the industralised manner it was carried out. As Lawnmowerman has noted above, it was not just mass slaughter, but a well planned and conducted extermination.
 

AlpinLuke

Forum Staff
Oct 2011
27,383
Italy, Lago Maggiore
Actually for Jews in general that wasn't the first time they met a "hostile" social system [leaded by religious or ideological thrusts].

So, if we focus our attention on the history of the Jewish communities we can just underline that Nazis added a genealogical factor with, as said, an industrialized method.

An easy comparison can be made with the persecution of the Jews in early Protestant Germany. Luther considered Jews a serious problem to solve and Lutherans were really effective in following this attitude of their leader. But the Lutheran persecution of the Jews was leaded by anti-Judaism, not Anti-Semitism.

If a Jew converted to Christianity, that person was accepted in the Lutheran society, despite being son of Jews. In Nazi Germany, being son of Jews was a well more deep trouble ... There are exceptions of Jews serving the Reich for the most vary reasons, but the genealogical base of the genocide run by the Nazi was just one of the motivations which made scholars define it "genocide" [genealogy and genocide have got the same root, if we note].
 
May 2015
698
Far From Home
Nothing unique. One more tragedy of very many. Not biggest, not worst, not most horrorful. Only one of many.

Trains? Soviet Communists too deported peoples in trains. Turks deported Armenians in trains.

Organization? African tribes with Chinese machete killed in Rwanda peoples more efficient than ever could Germans with famous Deutsche Ordnung.

Only reason people even can think any thing was unique here is, vested interests in media make eternal propaganda about Jewish holocaust and in comparison almost never mention other genocides. Because of this people think some how this was special.

Really I feel weird when read about people, say silly things like "I can't any more believe in God because Auschwitz/holocaust/horror/etc!" Because X million Jews were killed by Germans God can't exist. How many people say God can't exist because X million Chinese were killed by Chingis Khan?:think:
 

EmperorTigerstar

Ad Honorem
Jun 2013
6,398
USA
All genocides have similar motives and origins. The Holocaust is unique in that it's done by an at-the-time modern Western nation using industrial tactics in its killings.