is there a record of which delegates voted for/against independence on 2 July 1776?

Jul 2014
8
Hoschton, GA, United States
While the approval of the written Declaration is often celebrated as the nation's birthday, the severance of all political ties to the British King actually took place place two days earlier. I've looked through the journal that the Second Continental Congress kept, and while the entry for 2 July 1776 does list the passage of the following resolution...

Resolved, That these United Colonies are, and, of right, ought to be, Free and Independent States; that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British crown, and that all political connexion between them, and the state of Great Britain, is, and ought to be, totally dissolved.
...a roll call of ayes, nays, and abstentions can be found in other sources, but the votes were actually by state, with the majority of each delegation determining the state's vote. New York's entire delegation abstained from the vote because they were not yet authorized by the state legislature to vote for independence. Beyond that, though, I can't seem to find a delegate-by-delegate record of who voted for or against the measure.
 

Chlodio

Forum Staff
Aug 2016
4,580
Dispargum
That's... not what I asked for.
Read the article. Under the section "Signer Details" it lists who was there, who voted for and against, when they signed (not everyone signed at the same time), etc. It will tell you who signed later but was not present on July 2. You know how to deduct those from the list you're looking for.
 
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Dec 2013
95
Honolulu
9 for, 2 against independence, 1 no show, 1 undecided. The population at large on July 2, 1776 had no part in the declaration of independence and putting together a new nation, America. Edward Rutledge, Thomas Heyward, Aurthur Middleton, Thomas Lynch, jr. All four opposed. Two later signed the declaration later to give a count of 2 opposed and 9 for independence. The continental congress acted independent of the nation or colonial citizens. It was just the congress voting on that final day, July 2, 1776. Correction all four changed their votes. 13-0-1-1. Undecided and no show on that day July 2, 1776.
 
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