Is there much evidence of dark skinned people of non-African descent in the Americas historically?

Oct 2017
356
America ??
Of course there are Indo-Caribbeans whose first shipload reached Guyana in 1838, & they didn’t seem to have travelled outside the Caribbean much. It might have been frightening for them to think that race based slavery was still within proximity to them. I’m wondering how many South Asians would have been in the Americas & Europe prior to that. Western Europe I assume would have been more likely to have had more South Asians & other dark skinned people of non-African descent due to those countries’ colonial & overseas activities, more so than the Americas, especially after their countries’ independences, but for either I wouldn’t assume there would have been many at all & that any would have probably stuck out like sore thumbs in Europe at least. Also I would imagine most people would have been significantly darker skinned before contemporary times due to being much more outdoor & labor based, I would imagine many South Asians would have been nearly black skinned.

Mass migration & travel appears to have increased substantially during the second half of the 20th century, & that prior to that it was much less frequent, travel done by only by the wealthy who were usually white, & that of less wealthy people usually done for migration & usually for necessity like work & seeking better lives.

So this means that dark skinned people of non-African descent, being South Asians & Melanesians is all I can think of, perhaps some Middle Easterners as well, only seemed to begun migrating & visiting foreign countries substantially, the west in this case, since the late 20th century. Nowadays just about people from everywhere are everywhere, including dark skinned people of non-African descent, the South Asian & Middle Eastern diasporas are huge now, & they certainly make up a huge & significant part of the American population now.

Dark skin was since the earliest days of colonization until contemporary times associated with African descent in the Americas & overall the West, its only since the second half of the previous century where that’s begun to change with mass globalization.

The interesting questions are what would they most likely to have been doing, how long they were likely to stay for, how would they have been perceived, what opportunities & risks were present, what legal rights they would have had, among other interesting questions.

Would they have had to have white guardians or supervisors & carry freedom papers in the slavery era? Would there have been much risk of their enslavement, & how would they have been rescued if so?
Would they have had to obey segregation laws before they were abolished in America? Would they have been considered & called “negroes”?
 
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Aug 2018
337
America
Define "dark skin". I mean, indigenous peoples of the Americas like Dakotas, Mayans, Aymaras, are swarthy, just not as much as Africans. Look at Evo Morales or Rigoberta Menchu for example. It's why Native Americans in the US were (and still are in some contexts) called "redskins". When Columbus first arrived, he quickly noticed their dark skin, which is why he thought he was in an island off the coast of India, one of the classic places in ancient and medieval imagination where swarthy people lived.

Edit: If you're looking for possible people who looked the closest to Africans, then the possible prehistoric Polynesian migration into South America, which historians have now been postulating since we see archaeological remains far too old to have come solely from the people who crossed the Bering Strait, are the best bet you have. Nevertheless, as people further north migrated into the south, their skin became lighter and thus would not have been like that of Africans by the time we see the Olmecs appear, for instance. It's also unlikely that whatever Polynesian migration would have migrated further north rather than staying in the south, especially since it still would be too small.
 
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Oct 2017
356
America ??
Good of you to ask Escritor, I should have clarified.

Dark skinned is usually meant by dark brown onwards isn’t it? Basically the skin tones of those of SubSaharan African, Melanesian & South Asian descent. The description “African-Black” seems to be common now, but that term excludes those dark skinned of non-African descent. I would appreciate if the term “negro” were to be accepted by society again for clarity’s sake.

Good that you mention pre-Columbian evidence as well, though I think that’s still controversial, but I’m not saying that it’s unlikely in any way only that it’s not definitive yet.
 
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Oct 2019
124
West Virginia
Other than for the Vikings in Newfoundland, there has been no genetic evidence found to confirm any other arrivals in America prior to 1492. Nor is there any clear cultural evidence.
 
Oct 2017
356
America ??
Other than for the Vikings in Newfoundland, there has been no genetic evidence found to confirm any other arrivals in America prior to 1492. Nor is there any clear cultural evidence.
I’m mean throughout ALL of history, & as you point out the lack of evidence of external contact prior to 1492, I’m thinking mostly in terms of after of course. I’m actually focused on pre mid-20th century, particularly focused on colonial times.
 
Oct 2017
356
America ??
I’ve found these on google: