Jamaican Maroons: were they tricked into becoming defacto slave catchers?

Jun 2015
255
London UK
Could you explain the ‘Returned Maroons’? I never heard of this. Were they Jamaicans who later joined them after slavery or in the first half of the 20th century? I thought the Maroons still didn’t let outsiders join them. Or only those who married a Maroon?



Secondly can you clarify the changing of names the Maroons used to distance themselves from those they hunted? Surely they would stick to Akan or African names to keep apart? Wouldn’t the enslaved blacks have European names? Why would the Maroons adopt the names given by the plantation owners to the enslaved?
I know about the ‘Returned Maroons’ no need to explain. Did Marcus Garvey write about the Maroons? Little is mentioned in his books about them along with Haile Selassie He was supposed to be a descendant but he didn’t grow up in the Maroon Town maybe his grandparents? Perhaps the Rasta movement claimed he said Selassie was a diety. In Maroon culture especially in folk songs do they discuss the issue of being Slave catchers and serving the plantation owners to suppress revolts during and after slavery in the 19th century? Also the irony of all ironies going to Sierra Leone to put down revolts on behalf of the British?

I found this link about the Flagstaffaroons

Maroon Connection: A Brief History of the Trelawny Town Maroons
 
Dec 2011
1,013
Hertfordshire
Interesting, a Matrilineal society. But so were both Taíno and Akan societies, I wonder to which Maroons resembled more.
The Windward Maroons claim descent from the Taino, and archaeological evidence now backs up that claim.

But, as you say, the Akan influence was significant among the Maroons, and most likely the greater, as their ranks were swelled by runaway slaves.
 
Dec 2011
1,013
Hertfordshire
I know about the ‘Returned Maroons’ no need to explain. Did Marcus Garvey write about the Maroons? Little is mentioned in his books about them along with Haile Selassie He was supposed to be a descendant but he didn’t grow up in the Maroon Town maybe his grandparents? Perhaps the Rasta movement claimed he said Selassie was a diety. In Maroon culture especially in folk songs do they discuss the issue of being Slave catchers and serving the plantation owners to suppress revolts during and after slavery in the 19th century? Also the irony of all ironies going to Sierra Leone to put down revolts on behalf of the British?

I found this link about the Flagstaffaroons

Maroon Connection: A Brief History of the Trelawny Town Maroons
Being slave-catchers for half a century, it was easy for the Trelawny Town Maroons to put down revolts in Sierra Leone on behalf of the colonial authorities, because they knew they would be rewarded for doing so.

Catching slaves is a touchy subject in Jamaica...many Jamaicans view the Maroons as traitors, sellouts, and informers. As a result, the Maroons have a difficult time addressing slave-catching in their oral history. And then there is the role the Moore Town Maroons played in putting down the Morant Bay Rebellion in 1865.

To see how the Maroons addressed this issue, Kenneth Bilby discusses the Maroon oral history on this and other matters:

https://www.amazon.com/True-Born-Maroons-New-World-Diasporas/dp/0813032784
 
Jun 2015
255
London UK
Being slave-catchers for half a century, it was easy for the Trelawny Town Maroons to put down revolts in Sierra Leone on behalf of the colonial authorities, because they knew they would be rewarded for doing so.

Catching slaves is a touchy subject in Jamaica...many Jamaicans view the Maroons as traitors, sellouts, and informers. As a result, the Maroons have a difficult time addressing slave-catching in their oral history. And then there is the role the Moore Town Maroons played in putting down the Morant Bay Rebellion in 1865.

To see how the Maroons addressed this issue, Kenneth Bilby discusses the Maroon oral history on this and other matters:

https://www.amazon.com/True-Born-Maroons-New-World-Diasporas/dp/0813032784
On page 345 they address the encroachment of Maroon lands near cockpit country by bauxite mining companies. This led to a near major clash as the maroons were mobilised rapidly by use of abeng and traditional methods.
The irony was that the Maroons were against any deals with the government and mining companies over prospecting for bauxite. They feared it was a ‘trick’ to take their ancestral birthright homeland or to wipe them out or destroy their way of life and history. One of the younger maroons was quoted as saying that he is prepared to kill to protect this little land Cuffee and Cujoe died for.

No note of irony how they were used or tricked by the treaties to serve the slave masters

Dancehall artist MR Vegas discusses the cockpit and the Maroons and protests against mining. He urged other Jamaicans not to support them because the maroons did not fight for Jamaicans and sold out. Unless they admitted they were tricked and apologies for the wrong their ancestors did